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Wednesday, 23 June 2021

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Setting your new watch to the correct date at the start of July will not involve interfering with the time: You just pull out the crown to the second position and a slight turn will advance the date, (turning it the other way will advance the day). All this while the movement ticks on regardless, so you will get a good idea of the accuracy over the months. Congrats btw. And we expect an update in a few months!

Re: the last thing I need is another monthly bill, there’s no monthly bill for the gps version and if you are referring to the fall detection, that works if you have your phone nearby.

Good choice.
I'm a watch guy ~trashed my cell phone several years ago. Replacing a watch with a blue face [hard to read in low light] I allowed my son to talk me into a Seiko Auromatic. Mistake. I find I have to wind it daily to make sure it keeps running. It also gains a couple minutes of time per week. Annoying.

Shoudda bought a quartz movement to get accurate time with no need to remember to wind it.

If a product does only one thing it should do it well to be worth buying. Mechanical [automatic] movements don't keep accurate time.

Mike,

All the watch discussion got me to get a new battery for my Seiko Quartz Chronograph.

Normally, the second hand for the regular watch function will move every two seconds when the battery is low.

The minute hand of the chronometer had stopped moving, so I figured I'd better start looking at watches again.

The lady at the chain jewelry store installed the battery in a few minutes and now the minute hand of the chronometer is working again! Woo hoo!

The battery didn't cost me a dime because I still have the receipt for the "free batteries for life" certificate that I guard with my life.

Of course, this doesn't mean I'm going to stop looking at new watches. :>)

Regarding the best watch in the world, I think that judging a watch only by its accuracy is like judging a camera just by the resolution of its sensor.

As you remember well, the Astron finished the wars of accuracy in favor of quartz movements over mechanical watches.

But now that watches are really obsolete for almost every practical reason, I think their more an experience than anything else, so there are other things to evaluate when thinking about the best.

I also love Seiko, own three of them, and I love what they do in the Grand Seiko line and specially the Spring Drive, an automatic mechanical movement that uses a quartz crystal and a magnetic field to regulate the escapement. This produce a unique continuous sweeping move of the second hand that is a joy to watch. Is also the last really practical innovation in watchmaking so far (the Zenith Oscillator is very interesting, but still a work in progress).

[You're right, Francisco. I was being hyperbolic there. I get over-enthusiastic. --Mike]

OK watch, but kind of dressy, especially these days. Won't look good at all with shorts, T-shirt, and sandals. Treat yourself to a G-Shock, such as the GWM5610-1 (around $94). It's radio sync ("Multiband 6") probably works OK from NY. Or, there are several similar and cheaper models without MB 6, some with solar.

Or, if you don't like the look of a G-Shock, the classic casual/sports watch is a dive watch, even if you never go deeper than 2 ft. Many choices, some < $100.

A very austere choice that looks like it will serve faithfully for years.

Not to tempt you into another compulsive obsession but...you -do- know that watches have become an investable "asset class", more popular each year. Just gaze upon Sotheby's current "Luxury Watch Auctions", for example.

Also, you -do- also know that the Apple Watch can display photos from your library, don't you? Quite well, too, allowing for close magnifications. And you can use it as a Dick Tracy-style phone, too? And you can use it to listen to music? And you can.... ;-)

On your comment about Amazon pricing compared to the real store you can visit.
It pays to double check when looking. Just got some tools from a real store that were 10% less than Amazon. A friend bought them from amazon and they had come from the real store. So, knowing the price difference helped and kept the dollars in our area.

Just as with the Big Box stores, looking around can often result in a better deal and meeting people who actually know the product they are selling.

"On the negative side, it's tough for me to read the day and date in poor light without my computer glasses on..."

Big picture, little picture... I also can't read my calendar without reading glasses, so I don't set it.

It will be the 23rd for 24 hours. It will only be 3:47pm for about a minute. If I don't know the date, out comes the phone. But I can know the time with a 20 degree twist of the wrist.

1 bar of pressure is 10m of water - I work in subsea construction - it is one of the things you don't have to think about after awhile

I think you made a fine, choice, Mike - Seiko is actually a modern classic to me in terms of watchmakers, one of the original brands that disrupted the watch industry half a century ago... And solar recharging really sticks it to the iWatch daily charge routine, what a bonus. Plus, there's a wee bit of a camera link to it given that the Epson R-D1 analog dials were done by Seiko, Epson's parent company.

I hear ya. we all must be having a little watch fever, I just sprung for this one:

https://bit.ly/2Usogkd

[Holy crap! Now THAT is a watch. --Mike]

Honger
For my mother, having survived the Dutch "Hongerwinter" of 1944/45, the words "Hunger" and "Hungry" were on the top of the list of taboo-subjects. As a child I was always corrected by the same sermon "You don't know what hunger is, you should say I am having an appetite", most of the times followed by one of her wartime stories, the favourite being the two milk bottles, that exploded because of the freezing cold.
Second on that list was the throwing away of leftovers of a dinner. I remember inviting my parents for a dinner I cooked at my house. After a pleasant evening, upon leaving, my mother saw me emptying a bowl of leftover pasta in the bin. She got very, very angry. I had never seen her that angry. It must have distressed her very much. This happened in 1980. So 35 years after the fact. The ignorance of my youth allowed me to be annoyed by this all. Even in my thirties I acted annoyed. Maybe I should have shown a little bit of understanding and compassion. Even in the last year of her life, she died at 96, she once again told me the story of the two milk bottles, and asked me if she'd ever told me this. I couldn't help but answer "Yeah mum, maybe a thousand times". Stupid of me, of course.

Congratulations on the new watch. It's an excellent choice.

I hate to do this to you, but the geography is compelling.

https://davidlane-design.com

If you can do without the pulse oximeter, refurbished series 5 Apple watches with cellular connection are available in like new condition on eBay (caveat emptor, but worked for us) at considerable savings compared to the Amazon refurb that is linked above.

My wife and I are seniors who both wear these Apple watches for fall detection (and that allows emergency services and authorized family members to immediately determine our location anywhere that there is cellular reception), but additionally they are endlessly useful for receiving news headlines, stock market updates, messages (including second factor authentication for account security), tapping on my (hard of hearing) wife's wrist to let her know that she is needed in another room, seeing real time pictures of our granddaughter's activities, alerts (including weather events, and monitoring credit card and financial account charges), pausing music, not missing phone calls (and lots more) whenever our iPhones are not within reach.

I continue to marvel at being able to wear on my wrist a gorgeous internet connected supercomputer, digital display, cardiac monitor, remote iPhone camera EVF and shutter release, wrist radio (actually at least four different radios - cellular LTE, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and GPS), waterproof piece of jewelry. (All at less cost that one of those ugly plastic medic alert panic buttons that only work at home.)

Who needs a mechanical or quartz watch (or a short wave radio to receive WWV time broadcasts) when my communicating Apple watch always remains time accuracy to within about 50 milliseconds of an internet atomic clock time server?

The future has arrived! WOW!!!!!

This is something you are unlikely to read elsewhere. But. My considerable experience with Seiko has proven to me that the Solar and Kinetic models are accurate to 3 seconds per year. Which is unmatched byanything except the top line Citizen range that starts at $1000.

Ps. Ginault are built to higher tolerances than anything I've seen. And I've seen them aaaaaall.

I have the Apple watch model 6 and love it. In my youth I tried to be a watch sophisticate but did not have the money for a Rolex Submariner, my dream watch. I was gifted a Universal Geneve watch with day, date, month year, stopwatch, etc, a real chronograph. It required numerous expensive repairs. Since most folks carry a phone, with many apps, the tradition of a wristwatch has gone by the wayside, at least amongst millenials. The last real watch I had was a Casio, solar powered watch, loved it but it was "just"a watch. My Apple 6 tells me the time, here, and in New Zealand where my daughter, son in law, and grandchildren live; it tells me my heart rate and whether I have atrial fibrillation (I don't but have a few friends who do), my emails, my messages, my activity levels, the weather, a timer, my calendar, it even tells me my oxygen saturation! I think I paid US$400 for it and it is worth every penny. I look forward to the next iteration which rumor has it will have blood glucose (I'm not diabetic but might like to know my blood sugar), and blood pressure. And it tells the time, accurately enough though perhaps not as accurate as the referenced Casio. Clearly it's not for everyone but if you like to have a computer on your wrist, it's hard to beat. And not, I'm just a retired pediatrician, a gadgeteer, but do not work for Apple nor do I own their stock, darn.

In case you want to geek out on watches, check out Bulova Accutron tuning fork watches. Space age watch technology at its finest!
But beware, you might be considering buying a vintage Spaceview afterwards (don't ask me how I know)...

Jack Forster of the Hodinkee video is a notable "double wrister". Apple watch on the right wrist, traditional watch on the left. By the way, If you get an Apple watch you shouldn´t get an SE, series 5 and 6 have an always on display that makes a huge difference in daily wear, no more annoying flick of the wrist to make the display come active (in about 80% of the tries).

You've put forth enough posts on watches that I'm now getting pop-up ads for watches. About 15 years ago my wife and I went on a cruise to the western Caribbean area. One stop had genuine Swiss watches without the import tariffs we have in the US. I picked up a Swiss made ESQ for @ $125. A few years later I took it by my local jeweler/watch repair for a battery. He pulled the back cover and paused, put on his loupe and closely examined the internals for a bit, then commented, "Wow, that is a very finely made timepiece". At least it confirmed I didn't end up with a fake.

I'm amazed that you can buy a beautiful piece of design that keeps very accurate time for so very little money. I was drawn to mechanical watches for a time because of their stubbornness to indulge in outdated complexity. I once traded a friend a Canon macro lens for a watch strap (not even with a buckle) to my Panerai mechanical watch. A marvel of optics and sophisticated autofocus for a tiny strip of lizard skin. I believe the strap had a higher retail value.

Many thanks for all this Mike.
Co-incidentally, I’ve been considering a update to my wristwatch.
Been down the road of automatics, but the servicing (3-5 yearly CLA equivalent) and associated cost is a little too steep. So I’ve also been looking for solar, quartz, with day & date. Only addition for me is 100m water resistance. If only I could find that in an SNE047 like model with 100m.
Will have to keep looking.
One of your other commenters mentioned Vostok - now that was an interesting diversion, especially the 24 hour face.

The Seiko SNE039 (black face) is available for $99 on Amazon, which is a pretty dramatic discount if the only difference is cosmetic, i.e. the color scheme.

Waiting for series 7 as it would have Gloucose measurement. (6 has oxygen which is important for Wuhan virus.)

I call my Seiko Premier Automatic Tamagochi because it requires daily attention, and stops working if neglected. I have it for 15 years or so and wear it from time to time. But I much prefer a completely self-contained G-Shock Rangeman, that does not require any care at all and always shows the right time.

In response to Ernest Zarate's comment regarding clocks and teaching...

I'm a retired chemistry professor. Near the end of my career, we built a new science building. The first time I got to tour the essentially completed building I was aghast to discover that all of the classroom clocks had been placed above the board at the front of the room... i.e. where the students could see it but not the instructor. Clearly yet another example of things designed and signed off on by folks who have and will never use the system they OK'd.

Being a known troublemaker, I agitated against this situation. My argument was simple... the function of a classroom clock is to allow the instructor to time their performance (and good lectures are indeed performances). After much ado, the clocks were eventually moved!

In response to Ernest Zarate's comment regarding clocks and teaching...

I'm a retired chemistry professor. Near the end of my career, we built a new science building. The first time I got to tour the essentially completed building I was aghast to discover that all of the classroom clocks had been placed above the board at the front of the room... i.e. where the students could see it but not the instructor. Clearly yet another example of things designed and signed off on by folks who have and will never use the system they OK'd.

Being a known troublemaker, I agitated against this situation. My argument was simple... the function of a classroom clock is to allow the instructor to time their performance (and good lectures are indeed performances). After much ado, the clocks were eventually moved!

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