« Rolleiflex 6008 Batteries | Main | Cameras Are Always About Lenses for Me »

Sunday, 05 April 2020

Comments

Why not support fellow Photographer/Writer we know as John Sandford? Get the list of his books - the Prey series is a good start - and read them in order?
That will keep you occupied for a few days and give a boost to a fellow photography enthusiast.

Pasolini made a good film called Decameron in 1971 based on the book. Wikipedia has a page about it. In one segment a gardener enjoys himself with several of the nuns in a convent. One of the noviciates asks the Mother Superior about their vow of chastity, and the mother answers, 'We make so many promises.'

Staged up for me is Neustadt and Fineberg;s "The Epidemic that Never Was -- Policy Making and the Swine Flu Affair." It is an Oren Grad recommendation -- the basic text handed out when he first got into studying health policy. There was lots to learn, and it had a happy ending, of sorts.

Don't forget Project Gutenberg for free downloadable eBook editions of both the Defoe and Boccaccio works you mention.

[Thanks George. However I doubt the Rebhorn translation is available for free, although I haven't looked. --Mike]

Q’s comment reminded me of an excellent Youtube video that was released on March 10th. It’s an episode of the Joe Rogan Experience featuring Michael Osterholm who is an epidemiologist and the Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) at the University of Minnesota. I really appreciate that Michael Osterholm does not alter his message based on politics and is not worried about alarming parts of the population with accurate information. He just does his thing.

Don’t let Joe Rogan’s crazy logo scare you off. This is a good interview. Joe poses good questions, doesn’t interrupt, and gives his guest all the time he needs. The interview is very long but if you scroll down to the 16th comment you will find a timestamp index.

I am using this time to dive back into The Courage To Be by Paul Tillich. COVID 19 is generating a lot of anxiety and this book is about finding the courage to face it squarely and keep going.
I never expected a 1952 book on Lutheran Exestentialism would feel so timely.

Many books are available free on https://archive.org/. They appear to be scans of actual books, coffee stains and all, rather than digitised copies.

I'd also recommend "The Last Town on Earth" by Thomas Mullen (a distant cousin) about a logging community's reaction to the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic.

And let's not forget Albert Camus' "The Plague."

The comments to this entry are closed.

Portals




Stats


Blog powered by Typepad
Member since 06/2007