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Sunday, 01 December 2019

Comments

How does this work for push processing?

Sounds good, might have to try it. I do find that boxed veggie stocks taste like carrots, onions and cardboard. I’d be tempted to throw a few extra whole veggies into the pot and just turn 4 cups of water into fresh instant stock.

I like it that you're taking charge of your diet and finding ways to enjoy food and cooking.

I'll pass along a new favorite of mine, heirloom dried beans, specifically as offered online via Rancho Gordo https://www.ranchogordo.com/collections/heirloom-beans

The Alubia Blanca Bean has become one of my favorites and is dead easy to prepare and store. Warm up a cup or two and pair it with your favorite sauteed leafy green and bingo, hot lunch. But they're all delicious and find their way into some of the best eateries in the country.

Mike, for those of us non-Vegans (we are out there!) try this soup using leftover Thanksgiving turkey: https://www.sunset.com › recipe › take-two-turkey-noodle-soup-ginger-chile (Sunset Magazine). Ginger is good for you - right?

Looks to be gluten free if the barley is omitted. Thanks!

Sounds a lot like a dhal, if you take out the barley & kale, which I’d definitely do.

IMO Dhal + lightly steamed veg would probably have a slight edge in both health and flavour. As it goes I’d also use fresh Turmeric as it’s way nicer than the dried & ground stuff.

Aargh! You Americans and 'cups'. Big? Medium? Small? Teaspoons are fine - they're fairly precise, so what's wrong with ounces/grams for the other stuff?

[A cup is 8 fluid ounces or 250 milliliters. Two cups in a pint, two pints in a quart.

We get blamed for everything. We got these measurement conventions from the English. It came into widespread use in the 1200s, probably because of the natural convenience of its "half and half again" nature. Henry VII instituted it as a standard and Queen Elizabeth I thrice enforced her grandfather's standard, at which point it became known as the "Imperial" system of weights and measures. So, please blame the Tudors. --Mike]

I don’t understand the complaint about ‘cups’, they are widely used here in U.K. and you can buy a set of measures in any supermarket! However two cups don’t make a pint here (nor 4 a quart) as we have 20 fluid ounce pints not your itsy-bitsy titchy 16 oz American ones.

[Maybe he's not from the UK either? --Mike]

This recipe looks delicious... and I've got a batch on cooking right now. I love this kind of OT content coming up on TOP. I switched out the barley for some put lentils and yellow split peas.

But what I'm wondering is, what's the benefit of using a pressure cooker for something like this? The recipe says 15 minutes of pressure cooking plus 15 minutes before you release the pressure, so the lentils are getting 30 minutes of cook time. But the packs for my lentils only specify 40 minutes of cooking if you're doing them in a pan on the hob (hob = stove top in American English, I think).

So is it just to shave 1/4 off the cooking time? For that, you're trading off the convenience of a normal pan, which includes the fact that you could add the kale in later in the cooking time, if you wanted (my batch is still cooking, so only guessing that it might be a bit overdone compared to the lentils).

I can see the point of pressure cooking with tougher cuts of meat that need long cooking conventionally. But not long after I got my Instant Pot, I started eating a lot less meat, so it's not seen very much use. Hence my interest in finding ways it can show benefits - it's a lovely piece of kit, and I feel like it deserves to be used more!

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