« Today's the Day | Main | Sony Announces Formidable New Flagship »

Wednesday, 17 July 2019

Comments

What impressed me about Oskar's account is that he shot 10,000 and did a PAD project for a year with his smartphones. That kind of thorough familiarity removes the emotion and prejudice (since we were discussing that) from one's eventual judgements and conclusions, IMO.

Exactly why I take the GR everywhere, no regrets of "if only I had a real camera."

My eight (8) megapixel Canon 20D produced files that printed double truck (two pages wide) in magazines! We have become spoiled by the surfeit of (mega)pixels now available.

For bright daylight my iPhone does well, especially for low res use in social media. For low light, forget it. Excess noise and lost detail are too hard to wrangle in software.

To my eyes and ears, claiming to be a photographer and using an iPhone is about the same as declaring yourself an audiophile and listening to .mp3s.

[But how about calling yourself a music lover and listening to MP3's? Could be entirely justified, or don't you agree?

Especially when you consider the number of composers and conductors and professional musicians who aren't picky about sound quality. I remember one classical composer who was a visiting lecturer at Dartmouth in the '70s. He said he listened to symphonic records using an old "suitcase" stereo, because it enabled him to listen to 33 1/3 rpm records at 78 rpm! He said it helped him hear and understand the structure of the music better. --Mike]

Oskar, for you comment to be relevant, you should state what phone you used for the unsatisfactory picture of your son.

My phone (Android) won't let me use the camera unless I give it access to my contacts list and microphone. So I don't use it for photography.

It's usually much simpler for me to take a shot with my camera than with my phone. My camera is always on my shoulder, always on, but my phone, unless I happen to be looking at a message or looking something up (in which case I'm not really engaged enough with the world around me to notice photographs), is in my pocket or in my bag. And even if it's in my hand, I have to open the camera app...too much fuss. My dedicated camera, however, is ready. That's what I go to. If I want to share whatever it is immediately, I'll then take my phone out to take a shot.

That's just me though.

That said, I see no point in even differentiating mobile photography from camera photography, or even film photography from digital photography. They're all just cameras. Boxes with holes (says the guy with two separate IG accounts for mobile and camera photography, lol).

But how about calling yourself a music lover and listening to MP3's? Could be entirely justified, or don't you agree?

Actually, I don't agree. That's because I can only experience music by listening to it, hence the quality of the sound is an integral part of my experience and enjoyment.

Similarly, I can only appreciate a photo by looking at it and image quality is an integral part of my experience and enjoyment of that, too.

Unfortunately for me, my ability to separate the message from its medium isn't very good. I can't easily ignore technical flaws or fill in gaps where information is missing.

Which doesn't mean I'm unable to enjoy music or photography in the absence of ultimate fidelity to the original(s) from which these reproductions are drawn, only that -- for me -- there's a minimum threshold of fidelity that first must be met and as they exist today, .mp3s and cellphone photos are rarely able to clear that bar.

Are people fascinated by the Mona Lisa because of the IQ?
Did people in 1965 go wild by (I cant get no) Satisfaction because of the quality of the sound?
I know I dont and didnt.
IQ is only one of the various components that define if and how good a photo is.

Are people fascinated by the Mona Lisa because of the IQ?

Probably not, but paintings are not photographs.

Did people in 1965 go wild by (I cant get no) Satisfaction because of the quality of the sound?

Probably not, but they really didn't have any alternative, because even the best sound quality possible those days was pretty dismal compared to what became technically possible over the following decades.

Also, high fidelity isn't necessarily a pre-requisite to enjoy rock or other music that originates with electronic instruments and has been heavily processed by the time it reaches the ears of its fans.

This is very much different from when non-amplified, acoustical instruments are used and their characteristic sounds have a real-world reference that is widely known to (and appreciated by) its listeners.

I know I dont and didnt.

As the saying goes, YMMV! Hey, I enjoy listening to, say, grungy death metal on occasion as much as the next guy and I accept its generally crappy sound quality is a large part of its appeal.

But when I'm listening to Shostakovitch's Seventh Symphony or vintage acoustic jazz, crappy sound quality gets in the way of my enjoyment instead of enhancing it.

And while it's possible to degrade sound and/or image quality by processing it, it's not possible to improve it by doing the same. If low-res .mp3s and .jpgs captured by cellphone cameras are good enough for the hoi polloi, then everyone will ultimately suffer as the bar will have been lowered, not raised, thanks to advancing technology, which isn't how this process is supposed to work.

IQ is only one of the various components that define if and how good a photo is.

Sure, but only so long as crappy IQ is an intentional choice made by the photographer, not an inevitable result imposed upon them by using a camera that's been dumbed-down enough to fit inside a cellphone.

Don't get me wrong, as I'm no Luddite. I believe there's definitely a place for cellphone photography in today's world. It's just that I don't see it as a replacement for the cameras that many of us have come to know and love, that's all.

Alas, once a critical mass is achieved in the market, the dumbed-down version of whatever will become the only version available. As one who enjoys using manual transmissions in a car, I am all too keenly aware of this marketplace reality... 8^(

The comments to this entry are closed.