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Friday, 10 May 2019

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Thanks. For some moving elephant pix, check this out: https://www.instagram.com/sheldricktrust/

It seems that lens perfection has now taken the place of pixel count as the feature to be pushed on us photographers, many of whom have little power to resist. Yes, I agree, it would be great to see manufacturers compete to provide the simplest really good lenses and cameras.

I recently decided to sell my Olympus EM1 mk2, and my set of Olympus 'Pro' lenses. The camera and lenses are perfect, except for size, and in the case of the camera, complexity. I realized that I had once again succumbed to buying a DSLR, but in this time cleverly disguised. It's the type of camera/lenses that I buy on spec lust, but then don't actually use much in practice. I had to do something drastic when I realized that I had only used the superb 17mm f/1.2 Pro for test shots in the entire time I owned it! (I hope this is the very last time I need to re-learn this lesson!)

Even with the custom selections on the EM1.2, I still found that getting fluent with the camera was impossible; so it has to go. Oddly perhaps, I decided to keep my 7 year old EM5, (and some non-pro but light lenses) which according to Lightroom is my most used camera of all time, closely followed by my 5 year old Leica M. I only use the EM5 now when I really need auto-focus or something else that the M cannot provide, so I expect the M will soon overtake it in usage.

I find my tolerance for 'big', 'heavy', 'complex', but 'excellent' is getting less and less each month, being replaced by 'small', 'light', 'intuitive', but still 'excellent'. Now I'm looking for an intuitive auto-focus camera, and unfortunately the best option for me seems to be the Leica Q2. It's going to need a lot of thought.

I am in awe of the dedication and patience of some nature photographers. Entirely worth it though.

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