« Eerie Events | Main | Photographer of the Parks »

Thursday, 17 December 2015

Comments

Mike,
Talk about walking into the lions den, you do realize that if you start reviewing more cameras and lenses you will soon find new ones you just HAVE to own!

Or as Vonnegut would say "So it goes."

Photograph in the rain and fog, yes.
However thankfully Mike is not all wet!
Enjoy the "sample" boxes from LensRentals!

Rain be damned, Sigma 24/1.4 Art on a horrible windy and rainy day.
https://flic.kr/p/A9Xhj4
Get out there :-)

Yep, the rain gods are in cahoots with the demons in charge of mocking those afflicted by GAS, for sure. When I rented an RX-10 from Lens rentals before deciding to buy one, it rained the entire period of the rental.

And I got my new A6000 last week - thanks again for the heads up on the pricing - only to face a week of rain and wind.

I am pairing the A6000 with a 19mm Sigma, and I'm very, very pleased with the performance of the combination. That is quality in absolute terms, setting aside 'bang for the buck', which is off the charts.

Ok, so the Prior film answers my question: does anyone use color correction and graduated filters on digital cameras--and how? I guess with high luminance differences, grad filters might provide some advantage to using digital filtration in LR or PS. I imagine this is Lee's goal with this series of film: to make the case that they are still needed. But if so, they should take this question on directly and have one of their photographers say: I use digital filtration, but there are times that I can't do without glass.

I'm unhappy and uncomfortable photographing in rain (and cold, and snow, and...), certainly. Partly because I'm somewhat too protective of my equipment, I suppose. I've seen many excellent photos taken under those various conditions (got some fairly nice snow shots of my own even). But it's an added challenge, and borrowed gear does need extra care, too.

The comments to this entry are closed.