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Monday, 08 January 2018

Comments

Good job. Don't fall into the trap of laying off because you had such a good weekend. Be sure to touch it every day.

Great work Mike.
For us whom are clueless on writing, ok maybe I am just clueless, how many words are in an average book. Or more on point, what is your target word count so I can get an idea.
Thank you,
David

[John tells me publishers expect novels to be 80–120k words long, with 100k being good to shoot for. Reason: readers like a sense of accomplishment when they finish a book. I hear mysteries are often shorter, more like 50-70k words. IANAE. --Mike]

Funny; I’ve written two novels and lots of articles and stories, and I’ve never rewritten anything. One draft, a litght edit, that’s it.

Sometimes even just comments could need a “ligtht edit” of course.

Sounds to me like J. Camp scared you a little. Word is that he doesn’t go to his left that well.

Well done Mike; you applied the seat of the pants to the seat of the chair. I do like the idea of a second place free of distractions. I get distracted very easily...

"For us whom are clueless on writing, ok maybe I am just clueless, how many words are in an average book. Or more on point, what is your target word count so I can get an idea.
Thank you,
David"

"[John tells me publishers expect novels to be 80–120k words long, with 100k being good to shoot for. Reason: readers like a sense of accomplishment when they finish a book. I hear mysteries are often shorter, more like 50-70k words. IANAE. --Mike]"


As Einstein said, "All things are relative."

In recent years there has been a movement among some of the authors of science fiction to write looooongggg novels. As an example, the paperback version of the 19th book in one of David Weber's series of SF novels clocks in at 1168 pages.

On the other hand, the paperback version of John Scalzi's debut (2005) novel "Old Man's War" runs only 311 pages.

As a comparison, the paperback version of "Deep Freeze", the latest book in John Sandford's "Virgil Flowers" series, runs 511 pages.

- Tom -

Good goin', Mike. Stick with that old stick-to-it-iveness.

I feel the same as others about your writing and enjoying and valuing most of your posts (a lot).

Wonderful start on your draft. Two tips, take them or leave them:

One. Work in time blocks called “pomodoros” (named in Italian after a kitchen timer shaped like a tomato). You set aside 25 minutes. Write down your goal for this time. Work on one thing (your book draft) only, not doing anything else (checking emails, etc.). If something else comes to mind you think you need to do you jot it down on a separate page to remember later, and go right back to your one task. To enhance this: promise yourself a small reward for when you are done with the timed-blocked activity (and give it to yourself). Apparently when we start doing something we are resistant to or don’t like to do (this may not be your case), a pain centre in the brain activates… however, if you get started this goes away after a few moments, so starting is key. The reward helps as well.

Two. From the book Triggers by Marshall Goldsmith, whose “client list is a who’s who of global CEOs”: create a form with daily questions each of which you score yourself on a scale of 1 to 10 each night. If you are not interested in other daily things to track (he’s got some great suggestions for some standard ones in addition to those of your own choosing), you could create a form for 360 days in which you would simply rate yourself from 1 to 10 on today’s writing, or perhaps just write down the daily word count. The awareness during the day that you will put down a numeric bit of feedback tonight is what he finds helps people stay consistent week in week out.

To those who dislike your non-photography posts, just remind them that, despite the name of this blog, it's not about Photography—it's about a guy who runs a Photography blog.

One of my fellow blog readers posted this in a comment once, and I found it a most astute, and correct, observation.

Thank you for the range. Also good work on hitting 1/5 the way mark. Sometimes just sitting down and hammering it out is the best. I wrote my entire Ph.D thesis in one weekend. It was all the time I had as I was taking care of my newborn son. Also gave my wife the time to write her thesis, which took her over 2 months.

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