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Friday, 14 July 2017

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Send him a Flickr mail. I assume you have a Flickr account, but if not, you should. One of its advantages is that you can send a message to another user from within the flickerverse. When the user checks in, a little icon tells that user they have an incoming message.

"technically I have the right under the Fair Use doctrine of the Copyright Act"

You sure? That's USA-only law. That person is in the UK, and your site is accessible globally. I wonder if that makes it more complicated. I don't know.

[IANAL, but I believe copyright law is largely international. The enforcement in the courts might differ between countries, though. It's not really a legal issue--I'm just not comfortable reproducing pictures for direct critique without permission. The important thing for this site is to be respectful of photographers, not just the letter of the law. --Mike]

all you have to do is click on his name on the page you are linking to and then click the mail icon that is next to the FOLLOW icon.

I'm guessing you might not have a Flickr account Mike? You can contact another member if logged in :-)

I've just dropped Paul a message pointing him to this blog, hopefully he'll respond.

Send him a message through Instagram. You can do that using the "..." menu, but I think you have to do that on a phone, not a laptop.

If you're a flickr member, click on his user name, which takes you to his stream. To the right of his user name is a mail icon: click that and flickr mail opens up. But I'm sure you've tried that...

Hi
Flickr mail should work (you'll need to have a Flickr account though)

Regards

If he's on Instagram, you can message him through that. That will pop up on his phone as a notification which a Flickr message might not.

Ah, York. A great place but very, very difficult to take pictures of - so busy, so crowded. Even that 16mm lens on the Sony isn't really wide enough in the Shambles. I've tried so often...

I know exactly where the other pictures (of York) were taken - I go there quite frequently. York Minster is hard to get a shot of from far away, because it's surrounded by so much clutter; and when you stand in front of it at the west end, you've got rid of the clutter but it is so big and you are so close to it - well, it's the kind of situation that an old View camera with movements is perfect for, but a camera without them struggles in.

My personal feeling is that the best view in York is the interior of York station - a very grand Victorian structure, and still in use for exactly the purpose it was built for.

Could you use your own fine photographs for demonstration purposes Mike?

There is a great, though a bit dated book about programming called "The Elements of Programming Style" by Kernigham and Plauger.

They proceed to take examples from programming textbooks, find the bugs and deficiency's and comment on them, generally re-writing the code to be clearer (and correct!). Along they way they do add some pretty snarky comments. ("People who are worried about efficiency might also notice that the function is evaluated twice as often as need be. Since the answers are wrong, however, this seems unimportant")

They mention that they got permission to do this, though one wonders how many folks did *not* give their permission.

He's on Facebook too
https://www.facebook.com/paul.grubb.524

I would love to link all my online accounts as
David Raboin recommened but IMO Flickr is a disaster. I wish I had never gotten into it. After I joined they linked it to Yahoo so that (theoretically) I could sign in via Yahoo. I was never able to sign in consistently after that because of "conflicts" between the accounts. I spent many hours and pulled out much hair trying to fix the problem through their merry-go-round of help and FAQs to no avail. I decided to simply delete the account.

A year of so ago I managed, via what could only have been a minor miracle, to reach an actual human at Yahoo who promised to delete the account for me but he/she said that by company policy it would take 90 days. I just checked, it is still there, I still can't get in, the "help" merry-go-round still goes round without ever getting anywhere. I hear that AT&T bought Yahoo/Flickr. Maybe I should contact them. Arrrgh!

Sorry to disappoint you, but copyright law is anything but international. Among other things, the "fair use" known in Anglo-Saxon law sphere is not applicable in continental Europe. Unless a picture is explicitly set under Creative Commons License or Public Domain, there's no legal way to use it without the author's consent.

Hi All

I have made contact with Mike (via Flickrmail in the end) :)

Cheers ... Paul

Not sure if the remark: "Every mistake that happens on a computer or the Internet is your fault, though, so, my fault." is intended to be taken seriously or as sarcasm, but unfortunately, this is the way most people react to bad design.

If the user interface fails, it is the fault of the engineer/programmer, not the user.

Over the past few years it seemingly has become acceptable and commonplace to ignore established human user interface design wisdom to inflict arbitrary changes and inconsistencies that render using computers harder and more confusing. The worst trend is hiding the controls to pretend that what is increasingly complex and difficult to use will superficially appear to be "simple."

Mike - I left a comment on the image with a link back to your article - so maybe he will contact YOU. I always seem to go a few days without noticing I have flickr mail...

I'm glad to see some photographers are interested in unifying their various online presences. This is a core precept of the ideas behind the indieweb. Check out http://indieweb.org/Indieweb_for_Journalism as a starting point, and, indeed the whole of that wiki for tips.

Owning your material and the conversations around it is really important, and indieweb makes that more possible than ever.

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