« The TIME Magazine Cover Controversy | Main | Four Photography Books »

Friday, 09 December 2016

Comments

My "barrel" wasn't round but it had to be Big! Just a great photo, by the way, with B&W working really well here.

How ironic. I'm reading E.B. White's "One Man's Meat" with Jill Krementz's above photograph on the cover.

I have to wonder if the frame of the image is tilted off level (at least based on the horizon) on purpose. I appreciate displaying an image off kilter for artistic reasons as I do that frequently but it always catches my eye when water levels are involved. I feel like the water is going to run off the edge.

I had no money when I went to the University of Iowa the first time, but I realized early-on that I could graduate in seven semesters instead of the usual eight if I maxed out the allowable semester hours each semester -- if I took nineteen instead of the usual sixteen as a full load. But it wasn't easy to figure out how to hit nineteen right on, until I discovered the Iowa Writers Workshop. You could get one to six credits from the workshop, any way you wanted to do it, for a maximum of six credit hours. If I couldn't get exactly nineteen hours in a semester, I would sign up for one or two credit hours (however many I needed) from the workshop, and do the same in the other semesters. If I did hit nineteen right on, I wouldn't sign up for the workshop at all. In the court of doing that, I had Kurt Vonnegut as an instructor twice. He wasn't very good; it was like trying to learn writing from a talk show. He'd pace up and down, laughing and joking with his favorites, wearing an apricot-colored mohair sweater. The most important influence he had was actually writing: you could hear him in his quonset hut, banging away on a typewriter, seemingly endlessly. This was fifty years ago, and I remember that to this day: a really powerful influence. And such a simple point: you write books by writing. Or as Dorothy Parker put it, "The art of writing is applying the ass to the seat."

Speaking of keyboards and photography, you might enjoy my photography project about "vintage" (mostly mid-century/70's) products including classic typewriters from Olivetti: www.massmadesoul.com

@Ed Kirkpatick: me, too.

"William Zinsser points out that the barrel in the foreground has to be one of the essential, elemental, and irreductible tools of writing on paper—namely, the wastebasket."

Mike, this gives me an idea - make a keyboard just for writers, with a super-size DELETE key complete with large bold red wastebasket graphic!

...and on a similar theme, a dedicated "submit to publisher" key programmed to display a screen message "Proofread ONE MORE TIME" on the first press, "are you sure?" on the second press, and "too late now" on the third and final press.

One of my favorite photo books is: On Reading by Andre Kertesz. It's what we all do once the writer is done.

I can't look at this with the tilted horizon. It just makes me want to look away, like a person's deformity. As a friend said, we have "built in spirit levels". Is it necessary to the picture?

Another wonderful photographer who started off by specialising in portraits of writers was Fay Godwin, though in her case she's, deservedly I think, better known for her politically engageed work on land/scape.

...and don't forget Joel's 'Unit of Water, Unit of Time'. As a Maine sailor, one of the best books I've read.

Not sure this would have looked any more arresting ...
https://timauger.smugmug.com/organize/Miscellaneous-bits-and-pieces/i-7hVF29G

"The most important influence he had was actually writing: you could hear him in his quonset hut, banging away on a typewriter, seemingly endlessly. This was fifty years ago, and I remember that to this day: a really powerful influence. And such a simple point: you write books by writing. Or as Dorothy Parker put it, "The art of writing is applying the ass to the seat."

Posted by: John Camp

......................

As John says, you write books by writing. You could also say: it's the same with being a photographer; just take the darn pictures!

Rob

The comments to this entry are closed.