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Wednesday, 29 June 2016

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It would make little difference--cameras in my dreams typically jam, or are so slow-working that they might as well be jammed. Hm...

I have that dream a lot... well sans the George Harrison angle. I'm often looking for or missing some important component. A recurrent theme is walking a patient down endless corridors looking for the MRI scanner. Suppose it's a manifestation of my occasionally stressful job as a trauma center MRI tech.

My Fuji X100T goes with me everywhere.

If George Harrison were alive today, he'd be banging his coffin's lid and screaming 'get me out'.

In my recurring dream I'm in a modern day remake of Blow-Up, the 1966 film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni where a fashion photographer originally played by David Hemmings believes he has unwittingly captured a murder on film. We've advanced so far technically in my dream that I'm using a Zeiss F/.01 implant cornea lens that automatically sends images to my editor at the Washington Post. I've accidentally scanned images as I was taking a walk of what I believe are the First Lady having an affair behind some shrubs on the White House grounds. I always wake from my dream when I realize the First Lady is Bill Clinton.

[I think dreams like that are called "nightmares," Ned! --Mike]

"In my recurring dream I'm in a modern day remake of Blow-Up, the 1966 film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni where a fashion photographer originally played by David Hemmings believes he has unwittingly captured a murder on film. We've advanced so far technically in my dream that I'm using a Zeiss F/.01 implant cornea lens that automatically sends images to my editor at the Washington Post. I've accidentally scanned images as I was taking a walk of what I believe are the First Lady having an affair behind some shrubs on the White House grounds. I always wake from my dream when I realize the First Lady is Bill Clinton."

Could be worse. Imagine if it was Mrs Trump.

I'm like your girlfriend, Mike.:)

I could almost say that I never dream, except for the rare times that I wake with an almost static scene in my head, just a situation that I'm in. There's never any back story or progression.

And I sure would like to know why I miss out on all the fun that others seem to have.

On the other hand, I can almost always immediately put my finger on the reason for the dream. Usually anxieties and concerns. But there's just so few to interpret.

Myself and many others I know that have been to college still (into our 40s and 50s)have nightmares about missed classes or unprepared for tests. Weird.

Talking of "glasses", "spectacles" whatever made we wonder if there has ever been a reference in TOP to William Gibson's (maybe prescient) use of Zeiss Icons as a nod towards the future (Burning Chrome etc) - and given the regular occurrence of Zeiss on the pages here...

Maybe he's a reader

Inspired by the post concerning the X100T left in the over head rack, I offer:

Always know where you are likely to leave your camera.

Although it has never happened with anything so precious as an X100T, I have this thing in my head that asks: Why are you putting this thing down here?, you know you are going to walk off without it. And then.......I guess it goes back to that comment you made a few months ago about people never really changing.

When I worked as a Photographer for a Major Fortune 500 Company I had many "nightmares" regarding my camera not working or not being able to get the group shot arranged for one reason or another. This usually happened days before or the night before an important executive group photo session. I know why I had these dreams, it was being worried about the upcoming event but in your case the George Harrison just seems so out there, good dream story however.

The linked piece by Chris Floyd and the accompanying portraits of Paul McCartney are priceless. They brought back so many memories for me. I came of age in the 60s, and like all of my friends, was a tremendous fan of the Beatles. Some of Paul's post-breakup work is truly excellent, and it's too bad that he has gotten so little recognition for it. I think that his sin has been that he lives on while John Lennon, tragically, does not. Martyrdom has a way of coloring people's opinions.

I'm pretty sure that if I ever met Paul in person, I would attempt no photos other than the obligatory selfies.

"...Myself and many others I know that have been to college still (into our 40s and 50s) have nightmares about missed classes or unprepared for tests. Weird..."

It's somewhat reassuring to know that others have this dream as well.

However, in my case, it actually happened. I failed to understand that the "graduate research hours" that appeared on my schedule was an actual class in which attendance was required. Ouch!

I have this dream on an all too recurring basis: I've set up my 8x10 view camera on my back deck, carefully compose my shot and leave, intending to return later when the sun has reached optimal position. I then forget about the camera until I suddenly remember at the conclusion of a heavy rainstorm.

Recent studies on dream analysis dispense with much of the Freud/Jungian debate and instead frame it in a different way.
Namely, that in dreams our subconscious is putting us in a training programme to prepare us for our daily realities.
So, a Palaeolithic hunter would dream about Sabre-tooth tigers as that would be an unresolved fear that the subconscious was retraining Grok to deal with. Only when he is confident of dealing with the tiger in his dreams would he then feel confident of dealing with one in reality.
Photographers' fears are usually about not having a camera/film/ability to load the film/focus/ and any number of annoying things that prevent a phototgraph being taken successfully. The subconscious takes special delight in making us look foolish about it at the same time.
I always wake after such dreams with a sense of embarrassment and frustration at my dream-self's inability and it does give me fresh resolve to not be so complacent about future assignment preparation. Even to the extent that I now use a written equipment checklist instead of the previous mental one.

In the 1990s I suffered with undiagnosed severe sleep apnea. I used to almost instantly fall asleep in my chair whenever I sat down alone at my computer. It was very noticeable that I also instantly started to dream. I think my brain was desperately trying to make up for the REM sleep I wasn't getting at night. I'm a believer that dreams and REM sleep are when your brain is sorting and processing the information it's received recently. (In July 2000 I started using CPAP. What a lifesaver, what a revelation!)

Also, back in the 1970s and early 80s, I went through a long period of undiagnosed depression. I remember saying to friends that I never dreamed any more. I didn't know why. But once the depression was diagnosed and treated, the dreams returned. They're more than just curiosities, they seem to be vital to our wellbeing. It's because our sleep rhythms are disturbed when we're depressed or just sleeping badly.

The only time I have vivid dreams is during long afternoon naps. At times, they're almost as entertaining as going to a movie!

Is it possible that the general public are better at this than photographers? Cell phone=camera, after all, and someone who's *not* a photographer possibly may have that relationship more firmly fixed in their mind than we do.

OT: Did I miss this on TOP or did you?:

Street style chronicler Bill Cunningham passes away at 87

Thanks for TOP.
Henk

Are your dreams in Kodachrome, B&W, sepia or any one of the other colour or mono options (film or digital versions)?

[You laugh, but sometimes my dreams take the form of movies I'm watching, and the entire action of the dream sequence is a movie, occasionally with specific actors and camerawork and yes, color palette. And I'm not even a big fan of movies any more--I haven't watched more than a half dozen in any of the past half dozen years. --Mike]

Hiya!

> In a previous life as a psychotherapist...we found that the emotions
> attached to the content were more illuminating. Feelings which are
> repressed when awake seem to surface in dreams!"

Uh-oh! I had a full blown nightmare the other night. Serial killer type person creaking up the stairs, and I was unable to scream out a warning to my family. It was caught in the absolute iron grip of terrifying, um, terror in my throat, and no matter how hard I tried to force it out, no sound would emerge - in my dream. According to my wife, I managed quite perfectly in reality, thank you very much.

I'm often somewhat self-aware in dreams (not quite lucid dreaming) and my most common observation is: who writes this stuff? The writers need to be fired, seriously. If there's no limits to dreams, and you can do whatever you can imagine, why am I stuck in traffic running from zombies? Where's the Italian supermodels?

I don't mind that there's other people living in my head, I just wish they'd pull their weight.

A close friend used to keep a record of all his dreams (in a diary next his bed cos you forget your dream by the time you reach the WC), and over the years came to a conclusion that his dreams had no bearing to outcome of events in his life.

When I was young, I would know that I was dreaming because another part of my brain would remember that I dropped off to sleep; knowing that, I would play along in my dreams. Does not happen now. Getting old.

Mike, my question about whether your dreams are in Kodachrome etc was not aimed at being funny, I do sometimes have a sequence of B&W dreams, sometimes quite gaudy colour dreams and very often as movies.

[Sorry if I misinterpreted! I'm not aware of ever dreaming in B&W. Except when I'm awake of course. :-) --Mike]

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