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Friday, 13 November 2015

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There's a good 'First Day with the iPad Pro' video/review here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0C-8vhjtqw

Summary? - Close, but no cigar. Neither the apps or the OS really exercise the potential capability of this device. At the moment, it's just a big iPad.

I'm exceedingly fond of my iPad mini. I bought one the second I could. I now have a mini 2 with cell service, and I still love it. It could stand to be lighter, but I always say that. I use it for drawing a lot. So the iPad pro looks like it might be exactly what I'd want for an upgrade. Or at least not a bad upgrade. I'm looking forward to testing one out in a store, hopefully with the pencil.

I can live a lot more easily without a laptop than without the iPad at this point.

...funny this posting should come up, I spent part of the evening yesterday listening to a 35 year tech guy who's a reformed Mac person, sing the praises of the Galaxy pad, the simplicity of its inter-connectivity, and the length of it's usability without "orphaning" it's software and drivers; not to mention the initial investment. Have to say, based on his diatribe, I'd really have to consider the Samsung as well as the Mac if I was buying a pad...

"... many iPad users consider their iPads a) their least essential device, but b) their favorite among all their devices."

Yes, I might have to count myself among that group. My current iPad Air is simply terrific for watching movies, looking at images, and reading. It's a thin, light miracle.

Yes I'm interested in the "Pro". But I think I'll likely wait until the next version

As you say Mike it's a frivolous thing. Not necessary but just great.

But for me I have the 128gb 3 mini. SO portable and it will fit in a big coat inside pocket and for me is more book size.

I gave my daughter Molly my old one as what i do want is lots of space for stuff on the go.

As i am retired use my imac and this and have given away the portable computer ... Its enough and its fun!!,

Bye from a rainy and windy Strand in London ...

I do 80% of my book reading on the iPad now...

So how can you consider it not essential ?
:-)

The really marvellous thing about an iPad is that it fits beautifully in the back of a relatively small camera bag, so I am almost literally never without both 'essential' items.

I feel the same way about my Nexus 7. It can do 70% of what I'd normally do on my computers, and in most cases more conveniently, more economically, more comfortably, more pleasantly. It also has the best screen in the house.

It can't do the other 30%, can't replace the phone, won't fit in my pocket, and there's nothing it can do that can't be done by other devices, practically speaking, which makes it least essential. But for a while now it's been the device I'd rather use, and gradually becoming the device I use most.

But without wifi, cloud storage and bluetooth, tablets wouldn't be half as useful or enjoyable as they are.

What I find amazing, though not really surprising at this point, is that the iPad Pro is almost certainly the logical replacement for my wife's MacBook when she needs to replace it. And that's a computer she uses to do her work when at home.

I have the same Apple items as yourself, with the exception of the iPhone which I gave up on, but I prefer the original Kindle for reading in bed. It is lighter than the small iPad I have and the screen is non touch which means I can grasp it in many different ways. I've also read that the illuminated screens of these tablets can be detrimental to sleep. I know that if I awake during the night 30 minutes on the Kindle will get me back to sleep whereas the iPad seems to keep me more awake.
Y.M.M.V.

The relative performance of an ipad compared to a regular laptop should be taken with a grain of salt. For example the single core performance of the ipad is good when compared to a modern laptop, but multi core performance is not as good.

From Ars Technica:
"The A9X can’t quite get up to the level of a modern U-series Core i5 based on Broadwell or Skylake (see the 2015 MacBook Air and Surface Pro 4 results), but it’s roughly on the same level as a Core i5 from 2013 or so and it’s well ahead of Core M."

source:
http://arstechnica.com/apple/2015/11/ipad-pro-review-mac-like-speed-with-all-the-virtues-and-limitations-of-ios/4/#h2

The promo video shows Chinese calligraphy being done with no lag excites me to no end. I will make a purchase as soon as there is fund. Especially now that there is a nice kozo rice paper that makes great prints.

Here's a sample of what I do:
http://richardmanphoto.com/PICS/20150209-Scanned-769-Edit-2.jpg

I think it is overpriced. Like you said it is a nice to have but not essential. Laptop is a must for most people today. And the iPad pro is priced at laptop level. Yet, I cannot see that it can really replace a laptop. When Samsung and couple of Chinese make a bigger version with a good screen at half the price, that is what people will buy.

No matter what your personal opinion of Apple- and we are an Apple household- you have to be in awe of their marketing. Good grief, more than a grand for an Ipad??? And they will not be able to make them fast enough.

iPad, all sizes, useless, to me. Have tried to "like" (an over-used word) the device. Have purchased and given away two versions of iPad and an iPad mini. Keep fooling myself that the iPad will replace my Macbook Pro/27 inch iMac. It can't and never will. The iPad (and variants from Apple and I suppose too the Microsoft based machines) will not accept what "I" want to use on a computer. The apps, are NOT what i want. Apple assumes the apps are what "we" the consumer want. Not me.
And as I've mentioned in prior postings on T.O.P. the iPhone is too small for my enormous fingers and hands. Hit one key and get three, or four. Fingers are too big. So I don't use a mobile telephone. Am not concerned as to what friends and acquaintances are doing each and every moment of their waking lives.

Lots of file/folder access in iOS for the apps themselves it seems: https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/FileManagement/Conceptual/FileSystemProgrammingGuide/FileSystemOverview/FileSystemOverview.html

My iPad has completely replaced my MacBook Pro as an Internet appliance for out-of-the-office browsing, and for showing off my photography portfolio (I use a simple app called Foliobook for that).

For anything else, the dumbed-down and oversimplified iOS is a frustrating and annoying experience that I'd rather avoid. The hidden file system, the lack of expandable memory, and the inability to easily transfer files via cable or thumb drive from one device to another without going through iTunes have quashed any desire to upgrade from the iPad Air 2 to the iPad Pro. If/when the designers at Apple, in their infinite wisdom decide to treat their users like adults, and give them the ability to work as they see fit, maybe I'll reconsider. But for now, for me, iOS devices are no replacement for OS X computers.

Mike wrote: "...Apple is on the way down." Sheesh, you sound like one of the opportunistic but fatuous tech writers who regularly try to boost their readership by proclaiming the doom of Apple. The demise of Apple has been forwarned many times over many years. I've noticed that Leica is taking that tedious duty within the photography world. Bashing Leica while lauding the ever darling diva Sony has become a kind of meme among photo bloggers. It must be their version of race to the bottom.

[Leica WAS in deep financial difficulty several times over the years, to the point that it very plausibly might not have survived, and we have reported Sony's difficulties as well. --Mike]

The iPad Pro doesn't run OS X for the same reason the Macbook line or iMac don't have touchscreens - OS X is not (yet, possibly) designed for touch. Using a Surface Pro, I can hear gears grinding when shifting paradigms, going from 'Tablet Mode' to 'annoyingly close by not quite a laptop mode". Apple and Microsoft has very different ideas on this - Microsoft wants one OS to rule them all, Apple is committed at the present to optimized OSes (they have 5 flavors, now, with a common core at 4: iOs OS X, Watch OS, TV OS, and whatever the few iPods still remaining run). This June and WWDC will give us a hint if that's changing, I think it far more likely we'll see a version of Xcode for iPads before a touch OS X.

I have an iPad mini, but am increasingly finding that I work on my desktop, which tires my neck the least, less than a laptop, and much less than an iPad. Oddly enough, I tend to catch up on the newspapers online on my iPhone, not sure why that is.

I'd love to be able to run serious photo-editing and sorting software on an iPad device, but I'm not sure the 1.5 pound iPad Prof will be that device. At least, not until it sheds some weight.

As for your observation Mike about the Flote, you say "I can't afford it right now, but that's exactly what I need."

That has to be the very soul of gear acquisition syndrome speaking. :)

I am not sure I understand the complaints about lack of file and folder access on the iPad. It seems to exist where needed. I use GoodReader for all my PDFs on the iPad and that allows me to create folders and move or delete files to organise them. A similar function exists in Pages.

I have high hopes for iPad Pro + Pencil for photo editing, particularly dodging and burning. Haven't used LR for iOS yet, so fingers crossed.

My experience of Lightroom Mobile doesn't quite match John Lehet's. I find it to be pretty much ideal for first-pass editing (i.e. selecting and discarding) of "shoots". If it has problems then they haven't tended to bite me for my particular usage.

At home on my sofa I find using LR Mobile on the iPad Mini 2 to be preferable to full LR on my MacBook Pro and that I'm much more efficient at getting through a largish set of photos and making the necessary yes/no/maybe choices. Part of the reason is that, while many of the editing controls are there if needed, I'm not tempted to spend much time playing with specific images. I use white-balance, exposure, highlight, and shadow where needed and just enough to get an idea of where the picture could go.

Now the first thing I do after a new import is to make it into a collection and sync that to Mobile. The fact that anything I do on the iPad (or the iPhone, which I occasionally use when away from home) gets synced back to the MacBook means zero duplication of effort.

Richard Parkin wrote: "I am not sure I understand the complaints about lack of file and folder access on the iPad. It seems to exist where needed."

It depends on your needs, I guess. We have 5 iOS devices and 4 Android devices in our household. The reason why I only bring my Android devices when travelling is because I can use them to backup files (raw, mov, mts, jpg, etc) from my cameras' cards onto any kind of USB-connected storage device (HDD, SSD, USB stick, etc). To do that, I just need to bring a $10 USB hub with USB-OTG support. I can also use that to print boarding passes onto a USB stick which allows me to print it off on virtually any computer without having to have any kind of network connectivity at all. Or I can print the boarding pass to a PDF file directly on my phone or tablet (or its own microSD card) and plug the device directly into another computer via USB where it shows up as a storage device.

Today I just finished wrestling with an iPad that was running out of space. I deleted several hundred photos but it still said that I was almost out of room. After searching on the Internet, I found the solution: I had to change the system time to some date prior to the current date, then go back into the gallery app where it would then show previously deleted photos. I could then select and delete them (again), and then reset the date again. It was very aggravating because if I had access to the file system I could have just deleted them and be done with it. I wouldn't have to find out where the files were secretly moved to and delete them again.

I like iOS. I got my Mom an iPad because it's easy to use and she's now on her second one. But for myself, it's too confining. I don't like the app developers telling me when I need or don't need file system access.

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