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Friday, 29 November 2013

Comments

That is so painfully true.

As a family doctor, on a daily basis I am astonished by the strength and fortitude of average folks, and by the surprising number of your friends and neighbors who are contending, with quiet dignity, with genuine tragedies in their lives. You just never know when a kind word will make all the difference in someone's week. Or when a casual dismissal or insensitive slight will heap insult on top of injury.

One of my favourite quotes, but the original source was probably a Scotsman going by the pen name Ian MacLaren: http://quoteinvestigator.com/2010/06/29/be-kind/

Wasn't it Philo of Alexandria who first said that?

Being kind sounds to me a bit riddled with platitudes and charity. What we should do is try and understand. A photographic simile - when judging photos, don't just bring your own preferences to bear. Try and understand why someone else would like it. Not an original thought of my own, can't remember where I heard it, but I try and carry it around with me.

Indeed, every one has struggles in this 'veil of tears.' Compassion. Patience. These are called virtues for a reason.

Geoff: Yes, yes! What a true!

That is a great quote and it really got me thinking that is would also work well in the way you might view your business competitor!

Oh, how very true. A great friend of mine died recently and only after he died was I told about his life. I learned still more at the funeral.

We seldom know what drives even our friends.

Thoreau said something similar;"Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them." We all have dreams and hopes but much of the time the world gets in the way. Everyone's life would be easier if we all had more compassion for one another.

You'd have to say that the Internet Search Engines are the 8th Wonder of the World.

You can quote me of that, but I'd have to admit that "Google is your friend" has a better ring to it!

@ Geoff Wittig:

So completely true...

Bearing witness to the tremendous strength and courage displayed by "average" people who have entrusted their care to us in the face of life threatening/altering challenges is one of the great privileges of being a physician. I find myself regularly in awe and deep admiration of my fellow men and women.

that reminds me of something my triathlon coach said last week - never judge another runner, you dont know how far they've come or how far they have to go.

What an interesting article which brings back memories.
The Rev Dr John Watson was the first Minister of Sefton Park Presbyterian Church in Liverpool, England. My Father became Minister of this church sixty years later and a member at this church gave me a Kodak camera and started my interest in photography in 1965.
Sadly the magnificent church has now been demolished, but I still have a Kodachrome!

My axiom to this: Drive like we all have a three-year-old in the car.

The Rev. C.J. Stanley used to be a guest speaker at the Unity Church of Austin. She was old enough to speak her mind, but young enough to be energetic about it. She would say, "Remember that everybody's doing the best they can...It may be pitiful, but it's the best they can.

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