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Sunday, 04 November 2012

Comments

Mike, I hope you'll include more stuff by Jim Hughes.

Ansel disdained the word "pre-visualization," calling it redundant (which of course it is). It was in fact Minor White, Ralph noted, who had applied the "pre" to Ansel's own theories of visualization

As I pointed out a few months ago. The first chapter in all three of Ansel's books The Negative, The Print and The Camera are titled Visulisation (except that he spells it wrong with a z!).

Do you have a reference to Ralph Steiner's article comparing Weston and Strand? My Google friend let me down on this one!

Ditto what Bill Mitchell wrote. Does Hughes have a blog or any sort of web presence? I've often wanted to see more of his personal color work, especially since Kodachrome 25 was his film medium.

Maybe Mike can publish a book of his work.

Oh man, Camera Arts... that was the BEST magazine. Simply nothing else like it, literally or virtually.
Miss it very much.

The first chapter in all three of Ansel's books The Negative, The Print and The Camera are titled Visulisation (except that he spells it wrong with a z!).

See how I put a spelling mistake in a post about spelling!

Drdbr4x5 asked: "Do you have a reference to Ralph Steiner's article comparing Weston and Strand?"

Dear Doc (for lack of a real name): Ralph Steiner wrote about Strand and Weston in the premier issue of Camera Arts, Nov/Dec 1980, 'Perspectives: The Continental Divide,' a spectacularly illuminating piece on two of our greatest photographers that simply cannot be summarized here. But here's a quote from Ralph: 'So we have Strand using 144 sheets of paper to make a print, and Edward Weston one or two sheets at the most. What does this indicate?' Ralph then ruminates on this for several very detailed paragraphs. At the end, he quotes Edward Hopper: 'The work's the man; you can't get something out of nothing.'

'Young photographers,' Ralph Steiner concludes, 'need to locate themselves, and then to hitch what they do to that self. That is what counts in the end.'

--Jim Hughes

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