« 'Mindflow' | Main | A New 'King of Bokeh'? »

Tuesday, 23 October 2012

Comments

and is there a twice as expensive version in a red leather box lined with satin?

This is very interesting for someone with my tastes. I like to read about WHY things work the way they do. E.g. why do they choose certain glass and what effect does that glass have? Unfortunately I don't have any discretionary money and I'm afraid reading these books will just lead to gear lust for me and no way can I justify Leica prices. Maybe a library near me will buy a copy, then I can fill my trivia longings. Or maybe someone will make a Konica version? Fat chance.

Actually Thorium decays through alpha particles and a sheet of paper will stop most of them, so having glass doped with lead isnt necessary, but the high refractive index of the glass would have more of a reason for its use.

I have to say that I was quite disappointed by Puts' Leica Compendium. As with these new volumes, he did the editing himself, and it shows. The quality of the writing is poor, and there is a great deal of near-verbatim repetition, as if sections were moved around without deleting the original versions. I'm afraid that I am also not so impressed by the profundity of Puts' analyses.

On the other hand, like all things Leica it will probably go up in value, but not as much as if I had kept it in the sealed wrapper.

David

Great reference book for Leica users/fans. I bought it when it came out. The Leica Optics are my favorite...hard to resist buying more optics.

Word of caution: DON'T BUY IT IF YOU WANT TO AVOID TEMPTATION HAHA!

I have to say I agree with David. I can't imagine paying for 300 pages of Mr. Puts' unedited rambling on all things Leica (and probably all things silver-halide, knowing him).

Not only does thorium decay via alpha, it's also very low activity to start with... As in, "unless you left the film in contact with the radioactive element for a year or more, you're good".

The comments to this entry are closed.