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Thursday, 21 June 2012

Comments

So many wonderful, remarkable images with no credit whatsoever. Just another work day for press photographers at the turn of the 20th.

I could be convinced that #3 was captured by Helen Levitt. I could also be convinced that Bruce Davidson might have taken #36 (of course he didn't!). And wait, isn't that a little Berenice Abbott in #38?!

For those who like the di Salignac images (which are wonderful ex: #16, 17, 24) I highly recommend New York Rises. As you look through some of his images you can only wonder how the hell he managed to get his 8x10 camera, with glass plates, into positions to make the shots.

Ken's point is certainly one to ponder by all of us who work for hire or create our own work without an audience.
For thirty years I wrote COBOL code by day and photographed every other living moment for my own self.
The intellectual product I created for pay runs daily in the darkness of the mainframe completely without credit or even acknowledgement.
The photographs are mine but for the most part unseen due to the lack of access to the public eye that a newspaper offers.

Sal Moretti, Chicago policeman, turned hit man for the outfit:

http://ganglandchicago.blogspot.com/2010/02/feature-article-3-bad-career-move.html

These are a WONDERFUL find! I've never been to New York (or Wash. DC for that matter, guess I'd better get going on that before age does me in). These give an insight into how New York was "built", and the images are gorgeous.

By the way, does anyone see any safety clips or harnesses on any of the bridge painters? Holy Cow, I don't see anything!

Laurence

Love that top shot. NYC 6th ave. Reminds me a bit of Austin's well known 6th St. Maybe my shots from this area will be be considered history and art 50 years from now? I'll be gone but hopefully folks will still enjoy viewing "vintage" photography.

There are many incredible images there, likely considered no more important at the time than any of today's press images are today. Such is the challenge of proper archiving, and typical lack of same.

At least these are being auctioned, instead of what my last employer (a major daily metro) did, trash theirs.

These were all published? I don't see any grease pencil crop marks. Or maybe they got the negs.

"Sal Moretti, Chicago policeman, turned hit man for the outfit: http://ganglandchicago.blogspot.com/2010/02/feature-article-3-bad-career-move.html"

Uh...holy crap!

Mike

More about your observation, "a little horrifying in its implications": at

http://theartpart.jonathanmorse.net/2012/01/snap-shots-of-an-event-that-may-become-historic/

I blog about two newspaper photographs of an event from World War I that has all but disappeared from history. It survives only in a newspaper archive -- and when the Gannett Corporation took over that newspaper, it destroyed the newspaper's own copy of the archive.

I'm just looking at that newspaper photo in the post. It has a certain "Je ne sais quoi" about it that I really like. Can't put my finger on it. I'm not absolutely 100% certain, but I'll bet it was taken with a MFT camera....

#11 is the stand out for me. Wish I had a chance to print it.

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