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Friday, 13 April 2012

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Every time I hear someone mention abolishing child labor laws I suggest that they look at the work of Lewis Hine. Those who don't know or study history are doomed to repeat it.

Mike--
Shorpy.com is one of my favorite websites, and I love the beautiful images there and am the proud owner of one of their prints.

I think my next purchase is going to be this one: http://www.shorpy.com/node/12722

Also, I'm back in Yosemite, waiting for Glacier Pt. to open. Not very likely this week, it's snowing as I type.

I was just sad that Google's Muybridge tribute happened while you were on hiatus.

I love the old prints, especially of Addie.

The Library of Congress (loc.gov) has an enoumous number of Hine photographs, all of which are free to download, many of which are in TIFF high mb format. The collection is huge but it's a pleasant way to spend an hour or so.

cfw

Be careful with the Shorpy website, it is very addictive and you can sure spend a lot of time there. I speak from experience, I am a sucker for old photographs and Shorpy excels in that department.

I hate to say this Mike, but my Shorpy bookmark is ahead of yours, not by much though.

What a wonderful site shortly.com is! [He means Shorpy--see below --Ed.] There's a real lesson to be learned in seeing so many great photos made without the help of matrix metering, fast glass, and remotely triggered strobes.

Kudos to Joe Manning as well. Perhaps this whole post should be entitled "A Tribute to Hard Work".

Shorpy as with T.O.P is must daily read.

Sometimes disturbing, some times not.

Shorpy is a wonderful site. It only takes a few minutes there to visit other centuries, but I linger for hours. Their colorizations of vintage prints can be out of this world, and straight into theirs. Then there's a good stock of WWII Kodachromes, but, thankfully, nothing newer.

Did'ya notice, Mike that the photo recommended by Edie was made by a Johnston?

Child labour is one of those topics that no parent can bear to read about without something getting stuck in their throat.

I see in Addie Card my seven-year-old daughter. I cannot imagine her having to work at that age, let alone in such horrendous conditions. It still happens today, of course, around the world.

Hines did his country and its children a remarkable service.

It's ironic that in my comment praising the low-tech photos on *shorpy.com*, auto-correct on my tablet chose to "fix" the site's name when I clicked send.

Gizmos - can't live with 'em, can't live without 'em...

Hit Shorpy every morning, everything is at least amusing if not interesting...I try to get the short daily fix, as going back into the files is too time consuming! What I find even more delightful than the classic black & white images are the bloggers own family color transparencies from the near past, it's a symbiotic trip to my early childhood!

And herein you show the benefits of self-employment in photography rather than having a salaried corporate job: time to browse this interesting stuff. So much new to me here, photographically. So many photographers you highlight that I've never even heard of. really, I just dabble around the edges and wish I had more time to dive deeper (a bit of a pun as I'm on a scuba trip at present).

Shorpy is one of my morning round of visits. Always a delight, made more so by reflection. When I started in photography (age 10) many of the Shorpy images were only 50 years old. Now those same images are a century old, and all the more precious. Sometimes I try to imagine the world before photography, a different place without these wonderful time windows that now lay on our laps (or laptops.) Shorpy does the heavy lifting of rifling through the endless file cabinets to pull out these images and post them every day.

Great site! Thanks...

Shorpy is an addiction of mine too. I have three large prints from Shorpy proudly displayed on the wall next to my computer. It's the only other site besides TOP that I visit daily.

Shorpy is a great site but just for reference most of their material comes from the Library of Congress digital collection:

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/

Many of these images can be downloaded as high res tiff.

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