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Friday, 27 April 2012

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Mike Johnston browsing a web site called The Sartorialist?

Methinks the web maketh for strange bedfellows. <\;~)

Moose

Here's another great one:

http://www.thesartorialist.com/photos/on-the-street-les-tuileries-paris-3/

I knew I saw it before... She reminds me of... Dali.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Burning_Giraffe

Moose,
It's true I wore the same four pairs of jeans all the way through the Bush Administration, but they were black jeans, which I think makes me fashionable.

Dapper Mike

You don't say!

For a class, last term, I dug into the national archives of Canada, and put together a little series of photographers at work from different eras.

Here are the links to the pics. Click on the thumbs to see the full-size pics

Dry plate photographer changing plates, 1897.
W.H. Ellis was rather famous in his day for being one of the founders of forensic science (what the CSI guys do in the lab). One of his students discovered the way to test for alcohol in breath.


Ororeangnak, unidentified Inuit man, Fox News Cinematographer George Valiquette, and naturalist J. Dewey Soper taking a picture of an Inuit man, possibly Nu-Kud-lah, 1923.
In 1923 was held in Pond Inlet, Canadian Arctic, a rather mediatized trial for the murder of a white trader by an Inuit. For the first time, a court of justice was set up there with lawyers and the whole shebang. As most things involving First Nations in Canada, things did not go well. The cinematographer is a French Canadian working for the American Fox News (for the movie theatres, back in the day!), and the photographer is a major Arctic naturalist. The current description of the picture is limited, and I'm the one to lay claim to having identified the circumstances and the Inuit men on it.


Woman photographer photographs female munitions worker at the Dominion Arsenals Plant, 1942.
The National Film Board of Canada has the most amazing archives of documentary photographs. There are plenty more by Harry Rowed, but this one is rare enough to show a woman photographer AND crop/perspective marks. You can see that the two horizontal lines are not perfectly parellel. In the enlarger, when you tilt the easel until they become parallel, the vertical line will be perfectly straight (try in Photoshop!).

Photographer Michael "Miki" Berens at the Standish Hotel, ca. 1950.
This guy was an amateur photographer (albeit a wealthy one: Linhof Technika, anyone?) for a Gatineau hotel, shooting the famous people (mostly jazz musicians) and the patrons. Who knows who took this picture, but there's a dirty joke hidden in it... Note also the raised lensboard to compensate for the parallax of the wire finder. That's how pros did it in the day!


Mike Robinson daguerreotyping Gabor Szilasi, by Arnaud Maggs, 2003.
Three Canadian photographers, the last frames of a 35mm roll and the earliest publicly available photographic process: bookends for the history of analog photography. Szilasi, a Hungarian émigré, is worth checking out if you like HCB/Doisneau style; Maggs is also a graphic designer, and a typologist a little bit like the Bechers; Robinson is one of the rare serious daguerrotypists left.

Must be her shooting stance.

Especially THAT photographer...

"It's true I wore the same four pairs of jeans all the way through the Bush Administration, but they were black jeans, which I think makes me fashionable."

Not in mourning?

Moose

Ha!

Is she shooting or dancing? (Didn't they say Cartier-Bresson kind of danced while working?) Wonderful.

@Jed: A Minolta SRT on the street in 2012? Incroyable!

I look at the Sartorialist because it's one of the best street-photogaphy sites --- street photography of a particular kind. A few weeks ago (or maybe months ago, I dunno) the guy had a whole series on photographers outside of fashion shows. I couldn't find it in the archives...but here's another one that will get Mike J. aroused, if I remember correctly his taste in film cameras -- she's using a Minolta.

http://www.thesartorialist.com/photos/on-the-street-les-tuileries-paris-3/

Some more than others. Here are some more and some others ...
http://www.thesartorialist.com/?s=pretty+photographers

Despite being in Milan, I gues her name is NOT Manfrotto!

Cheers,

Walter

She is a strict adherent to the philosophy of photography, approximately translated to english as "The Decisive Shoes"

And now I am, too.

I've seen videos of The Sartorialist and how he works, and I wouldn't call that street photography per se; it's more like an impromptu fashion shoot held on the street as he directs their action and poses. I very much doubt that he happened to shoot her as she was taking a shot.

Fashion is not my thing either but every once in a while that dude lands a gem. This shot is one of them.

The picture lost something for me once I realised it had been posed. Don't know why.

Hmzzz,

I see something weird in most of these pictures....all those ellegant women shlepping around with heavy DSLR's. I once read a discussion in a girl photographers forum and they were discussing Canon en Nikon DSLR's, heavy 2.8 lenses, that sort of stuff.

And then men like moi, Ctein and Mike are using u4/3 camera's because we like the agility and lightness on our feet they provide (I weigh about 90 kg BTW).

Now what's that all about, any amateur or pro-shrinks can come up with a theory? I mean, Pana made a pink GF1.....

Greetings, Ed

Looks like madelung disease to me. Hunchbacked and thin shanked.

She certainly has all the angles...

If that's how street photographers look in Milan, maybe I should move there.
On the other hand, I'd be instantly ostracised if the standard is rigid.

Pretty rear view, but an absolutely atrocious stance for a photographer...

Meh! She's obviously using a tele-zoom rather a prime lens. Not impressed.
The legs on the other hand........

Reading the comments, you can tell that TOP readership is predominantly male.

Personally, I love the photographic aspect ofThe Sartorialist as much if not more than the fashion aspect. Excellent editorial portraits, IMO.

A street photographer in Havana:


Fom the series, "See See Havana".

And this is why cameras need image stabilisation.

Here's another for your intellectual curiosity.
http://cafephilos.wordpress.com/2008/05/05/imogen-and-twinka/

[Note: Not work / school friendly --Ed.]

Hot girl with a kit lens is as big a turn off to me as hot girl scooping her dogs poo into a plastic bag.

http://www.thesartorialist.com/photos/all-the-pretty-photographers-part-iii/

That jacket's not doing her any favours.

Notre dame est une bossu.

Bit_ _ stole my look!

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