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Tuesday, 10 January 2012

Comments

Eve Arnold was a champ, through and through. Look no further than her books on America, Britain and China.
She was also one of the first to recognise the decline of the marketplace...

99.9% of the viewer of the above photo must be wondering ... oohh, what camera she's using ? ... isn't that pre-production D4 ?...

In the above picture (sitting cross-legged) she is clearly using a Leica with 50mm Elmar, but what is the other camera with the long lens?

Bye Eve, thanks for the pictures.

Another of the Great Old Ones is gone....

I wonder how many of the worlds great photographs would not have even made the shortlist for the average camera club's annual competition ;)

I recall an exhibit of Arnold's work from China that was on view in Seattle in the early 1980s. Beautiful work, and the first time I saw dye transfer prints. She wrote something in the accompanying book about using the most simple equipment: "I want to be the tripod, the light meter, the motor drive."

"Encomia." A great addition to the lexicon Mike. Thanks

Inside / Outside

Light and shade

This ability to capture the moment and seize the inner light of a being

Mrs. Arnold was a respectful visionary

Eve Arnold worked with Nikon rangefinders and slrs, according to her comments in her Britain book.

What a great lesson: how to use a camera as an excuse to connect with people, rather than as a shield to protect yourself from them.

Bambang, to answer your question: I think that in that photo, she's using early Contax SLRs--looks like they might be Contax S model cameras.

Yeah, I know--my inner gearhead is showing through....

Re: Another obituary

Ten years or so ago, I enjoyed a series of intimate black and while images of kitchen utensils but never managed to remember the name of the photographer. Over the years, those images kept coming to mind and I attempted to re-visit them, but because I did not have the name, I couldn’t find them.

In today’s NY Times, I read this obituary for Jan Groover at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/12/arts/design/jan-groover-postmodern-photographer-dies-at-68.html?hpw and I realized that she is the photographer whose work I had been trying to find.

I ordered a copy of this book as a result: http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0934032076/ref=tmm_pap_used_olp_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1326395751&sr=8-1&condition=used.

I’m so sorry that the only way I could find her work was through the obituary. There may be a lesson here for me.

I wish that I would have found her work earlier. I really enjoy it.

@ Harry wirtz thank you for the link to the black and white kitchen stuff.

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