« Roller Derby! | Main | A Few Examples of Naturalism in Photography »

Thursday, 27 October 2011

Comments

It's OK to take a nap once in awhile.

Yes, I've been telling myself that :-) .

Sometimes your need to work on something coincides unfortunately with my need to avoid work for a while.

When we don't post comments, it may mean we are reading or digesting what you have written.

The calm before the storm lol.

It just goes to show, Mike, that you don't pay those monkeys enough!

No worries. I have come to know that, when you take time out to write, something good is in the works. I look forward to seeing what is on your mind!

"Be vewwy, vewwy quiet. I'm hunting wabbits!"

You woke me up to say this? :)

OOOhhhh! I hope its a pony!!!!!


Patrick

Did you inadvertently provide a temporary sneak preview, or was I hallucinating? (again)

Thats okay with me ... Sometimes I wonder where you get it from :) Hard work I guess!

Richard,
Sorry. An incomplete draft was published for a while sometime this morning. My mistake.

Mike

Absolutely amazing post. I love it . thanks

WE are to assume you, Mike Johnston are doing something worthwhile?

So we shall sit and twiddle our thumbs
and see what appears over the horizon as the sun sets. It is after all "that" time of the year. May all the pagans on line enjoy; and the rest of you may now wonder what happened...

One of my favorite books to browse is "Scene of the Crime." It's a compilation of black and white photos from the 1920 - 1940 L.A. police archives. Most all the photos were taken at the scenes of various gruesome murders, etc., and are strictly documenting the scene. They could not be more "naturalistic," and yet they are all devoid of any artistic sense. There is no illusion or attempt at art or mood, and they illustrate perfectly the difference you note between a photo merely referencing an event versus beeing naturalistic in an artistic way.

cfw

Your photograph of Zander is very beautiful, Mike. And a good illustration of your point, one of the special strengths of photography.

Calm before the storm is definately a good way of describing this.

The comments to this entry are closed.