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Friday, 06 May 2011

Comments

It worked for me, and I'm in Canada.

It's only logical Mike. If you're producing tv content that will air in other countries in six months or one year, transmitting it openly through the net destroys the value of your product. But I'm in Argentina an I was able to watch the video, so I don't think that particular one is blocked.

It worked in Poland, too. Best wishes!

Luckily, Comedy Central & Jon Stewart have yet to be blocked in Japan. Many other programs---including many PBS programs are---even though some of those blocked are not shown in Japan, and if they are, it is often at a time that nobody can watch. In effect, they are simply blocking anyone from being able to watch, either on TV or Internet. Not that anyone under 300 years old actually watches TV anymore...

I'm in Holland and it worked for me too.
Thanks for posting, KotW!

Worked for me in Germany - as opposed to many Youtube videos with background music.

If you want to view US videos, just bounce your packets off an open proxy to trick the Geo-IP blocking.

Try googling "US open proxy servers" and find a good proxy server to put into your internet options / network preferences...

Cheers, Pak

Yep, I'm a honorary American, too, it seems. :)

But that idiocy with blocking IP ranges is galling. And stinking to high heaven. Various series, okay, I can understand that. But music videos - So-and-So is the owner of the content and they blocked it in your country. It's promotional material, for Pete's sake. Do you understand the meaning of "world wide web" and the concept of promotion?

Even worse if it's the really real promotional material. I've had a film trailer blocked because of my location. A. Film. Trailer. Words failed me.

I was able to watch (and chuckle) and I am in Australia.

W.

Australia must have become the 51st state. Lucky I didn't notice, I'd have been quite upset.

Voltz

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