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Tuesday, 18 January 2011

Comments

Good review and seems like it might be a good book. Frankly though, I'm put off by the cover shot. Contrived, cheesy and something just too "artsy-fartsy", like what an "art" student studying photography might submit for his semester project.

I've read both versions and find his arguments/judgements very lucid and persuasive. His monograph books are further evidence that he is a master printer.

Personally, I find Barnbaum's cover shot to be wonderful. The tonal range of the subject, with it's single light source (doorway),must have been immense, but he has masterfully compressed it into a beautiful print. I find nothing contrived or artsy-fartsy about it.

As for the book itself, it is to the art of photography what "The Manual of Photography" is to the technical side (well, at least what the OLDER editions were about).

>an experienced Ilfochrome printer

Like Quebecois fur trappers, once common, but now almost extinct (this is where all the TOP reading fur trappers will chime in).

If there's one thing that Epson has done for me, it is deliverance from making colour contrast masks and calculating reciprocity-related colour shifts in Ilfochrome printing.

Voltz

I took a course with Bruce Barnbaum a couple of summers ago and enjoyed it. He gave me a lot to think about and I feel my photography has improved. What I enjoy about his book is that it brings me right back to his teaching. I'd highly recommend Bruce, in person or through text.

My late father-in-law attended a Barnbaum workshop years ago. He came back with nothing but good things to say about him, as a photographer, teacher, and person. I seem to recall that he spoke to him on occasion after attending the workshop, and Barnbaum always took his call and spent time with him on the phone.

Not only does Bruce conduct very meaningful workshops, but his fellow workshop instructors are all very talented photographers and teachers. I highly recommend his workshops as a way to accelerate your personal photographic development.

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