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Monday, 29 November 2010

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Although not as prestigious as George Eastman House, Project Basho in Philadelphia offers excellent courses (eg. Mobile Wet Plate Collodion by Bill Schwab) with very reasonable fees. I have taken courses on Large Format Photography with Tsuyoshi Ito, the founder of Project Basho, and Fine Gelatin Silver Printing with Chuck Kelton. Both courses were wonderful. I only wished that I lived a little closer so that I could attend the frequent lectures.

By comparison, Project Basho is the little engine that could.
Of course the George Eastman House is near the top of my photo Bucket List.

While I'm typing, I should alert Topticons to Excellent photo exhibits in New York. This past weekend, I attended the Steiglitz, Steichen and Strand exhibit at the Met, as well as two facinating exhibits at ICP. The first was the The Mexican Suitcase which chronicled the lost and then found Spanish Civil War negatives of Robert Capa and the second, Cuba in Revolution, chronicled Castro's rise to power.

Great story: only wish I could have attended something like this to learn technique properly. Sounds like the perfect place to not only archive photos but the technique behind them, drawing parallels to a classical music conservatory perhaps.

Pak

Over here in Wales, my envy knows no bounds.

@Peter Rees:
The George Eastman House also holds occasional workshops at the Fox Talbot Museum in Lacock, England. They're generally taught by Mark Osterman, who I mentioned in the above article. I don't know where in Wales you live but if you're fortunate enough to be in the south (or unfortunate enough, as my father, who's from Anglesey, would say!) it might not be too much of a trip for you. There are two coming up in 2011, "Dawn of Photography" and "Wet and Dry Collodion on Glass", both in July. Details on the GEH workshops page: http://www.eastmanhouse.org/events/series/photo-workshops

I love these traditional processes. When I was in art school way back in the early 90s I started developing an interest in them, but I was awfully busy just trying to perfect the standard silver printing method. I never got around to exploring some of these other methods. Maybe it's not too late!

If you'll allow me, this seems like a good opportunity to plug my friend's platinum/palladium printing shop. Laurent is a Parisian, living in Montreal, who is passionate about sailing and traditional photographic processes. He obtains old public domain images -- mostly, but not entirely, of turn-of-the-century sailing ships -- and prints them using the platinum process. He offers his goods (and an explanation of his process) at his website:
Galerie Cabestan.

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