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Saturday, 22 May 2010

Comments

The face on that press pass looks suspiciously like D. B. Cooper!

Nice! It's good for people to be reminded that things like news photos don't just appear, but are actually created by someone. Often someone with long and hard professional experience, sometimes at considerable personal risk, and that's why they're newsworthy. It's stunning how unaware most people are about where things like writing, photography, and music come from and who the people are that are responsible for their creation.

Jack,

'Old' or not, you must have biceps like Volkswagen beetles, hoiking that gear around.

Yay, good to see. I might pass this link over to the editor of our local rag (which I don't read, btw), even though it's administered from somewhere 'down South".

Seth writes: " It's stunning how unaware most people are about where things like writing, photography, and music come from and who the people are that are responsible for their creation."

Heck, most people are just unaware. I remember what one of my editors told me when I got excited about my first byline in the paper- "Don't get too excited, most folks will never notice it. Hell, most people can't even seem to read the "USE OTHER DOOR" sign at Nelson's Jack & Jill, they just stand there pulling on the damn door!"

I refrained from comment when this topic first was broached. But now I see a TOP reader feeling encouraged to contact an editor (of a publication that person doesn't even read, no less). Yikes.

Before I rant, a few caveats, disclaimers, etc... News people generally work hard. They put themselves in potentially dangerous situations. They spend long hours doing what they do. Some recognition for those efforts is deserved.

But let's view this self-promotion trend in a broader context. Newspapers are experiencing historic financial trouble, perhaps not at the same level as a year ago, but still in an unprecedented period. Like the newsroom where I work, staffing levels everywhere have been eviscerated to preserve the bottom line.

The solution to these ills? Some snappy advertisements featuring what staff remains. Some "brand building." That seems to me like a waste of greatly diminished resources with an even more disturbing undercurrent. A traditional role of news organizations has been to cut through these types of diversions to get to the heart of the matter -- not create them.

I'm oversimplifying a bit, but the message here is obvious. The content is no longer strong enough to speak for itself, so the work must be promoted some other way. Seth laments how unaware people are of content creators. I think most people just don't want to know, and I'm fine with that. Frankly, when it comes to information of the type presented in a newspaper, it shouldn't matter who created it.

And congratulations to photographer/celebrity Jack Foley!

My local paper the Glens Falls Post Star in NY state has some great photographers one is Erin Reid Coaker, he has won many awards and continues to pump out some great images.

Matt says: "Frankly, when it comes to information of the type presented in a newspaper, it shouldn't matter who created it."

I agree totally. I'm making a different point (I hope). I feel that people ought to be educated in what other people do in order for all of us to respect each other. Yes, I'm that naive. I've been a studio musician for thirty-some years and even my mother has no idea what I do. Many of the financial folks who live in my neighborhood ask me what I "really" do. It's much easier to steal music, pictures, words, and the like if you've never met anyone who actually makes a living and sends kids to college doing it. The fact is I don't know what financial people do all day long. The inability to see interrelatedness in a society doesn't seem healthy.

Well done Jack... I'm sure you're a worthy choice.

It's also great to see a company giving public recognition to their most valued employees (and believing that their employees are highly valued). This is something that isn't totally common nowadays in modern corporations...

Pak

Perhaps this has more to do with the "cult of celebrity" than the newspaper passing on any extra information of value.

Reminds me of a typical ploy in a TV series -- especially police procedurals -- where the victim is one of the principle characters (a law enforcer of some description).

Fall River, Fall River, lemme see, now... Didn't Lizzie Bordon and family live there, once upon a time???

With best regards.
Pfreddee(Stephen)

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