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Wednesday, 30 December 2009

Comments

That is such a meaningless quotation. You could say something is a journey with no conceivable destination about just anything really. And besides that I think photography has a destination for alot of photographers. Getting published, making money, coming home from a faraway country with some great memories, etc.

Maybe I'm just not a philosophical person.

For some you can say that, "Photography is a destination with no conceivable journey".

Well, it made me laugh. Maybe you haven't been on the journey long enough yet, Kevin? [g]

Mike

Perhaps you have a point there, Mike. I've only been at it for about 2 years.

Also, regarding 'it made me laugh', maybe I misinterpreted you. I assumed by posting it here, you thought it was a thoughtful and meaningful thing to say.

a destination with many routes

"You could say something is a journey with no conceivable destination about just anything really."

That's the whole point.

"Getting published, making money, coming home from a faraway country with some great memories, etc."

That is part of the journey.


For some of us art in general is a journey without choice, I personally can´t conceive any other way of life without being creative. I chose photography as my path in life, my way of healing and my way of expressing myself. I hope there is no final destination either, that would mean an end to it all.
Paul

Once you click the shutter you have arrived at your destination. As in life, what you do once there is up to you.

I bought a photography book last year from a guy at least 10 years my junior. he listed a couple on Craigslist that I just couldn't ignore. when i went to pick it up we got talking about photobooks and every time I mentioned a noteworthy title, he went to the shelf and picked up his copy to show it to me. He had 'em all, first editions, Gene Smith, Philip Jones Griffiths, HCB shelf after shelf of them. the ones he was selling were just culls to make space for new ones!!!

the quote has the profound sound of a deepity - a statement that has two meanings, one of which is true but superficial, the other which sounds profound but is meaningless.

that, and, of course, the inescapable fact that a photographer's "journey" ends when he/she drops dead.

"that, and, of course, the inescapable fact that a photographer's "journey" ends when he/she drops dead."

Mark,
I like the "deepity" idea, but I'm not so sure about this. If you look at the adventure of, say, Atget's work after his death, you could certainly make a case for his photographic adventure continuing. Or Vivian Maier, for that matter.

Mike

This reminds me of a Soren Kierkegaard quote that I heard on the TV show "Northern Exposure" many years ago: "The self is only that which it is in the process of becoming." It makes me think that we should always be working on improving ourselves in some way. I guess you could say the same about your photography. You should be always trying to improve or work on some aspect of it. You may reach the end of a project but even James Joyce continued to modify his novels after they were published.

(Eolake will be happy I quoted a famous Dane)

The use of the journey in this quote usually mean that it is not a project - with start, finish/failure but a process. In some cases, it is process that counts (like democracy which has no guarantee of good results to the satisfaction of anyone but only the process counts.)

This is particular true for some photography where even the author is really dead (instead of the theory that author is always dead), the process going on.

For example, a Chinese guy has given a family black and white photo album in exchange of some bread for his family after the WWII in Hong Kong. The receiving guy refused initially but took it anyway. He bought it to Australian. There is really a family story in the album. After showing this album to his friends for many decades for their amusement, he bought it back to Hong Kong and asked our local major English newspaper to find the Chinese guy or his family, as he thought that the family album really should belong to some one else. This is one kind of story of photos that might fit the bill. The picture is fixed at that time, sort of at least as one still have darkroom that time and photoshop these day, but the journey of individual photos is not sure.

The most enjoyable part of a destination is actually getting there. When you arrive it's over. May all your journeys be long ones.

This reminds to me "Murder by Death", a 1976 movie written by Neil Simon, in which the spoof-detective Sidney Wang (played by a great Peter Sellers) entertains his astouned colleagues by spinning out fake Chinese proverbs.
I'm really fed up of all this new age zen-ish blathering. Western culture (and language) urgently needs a healthy return to matter-of-factness.

Consider me also charmed by the idea of the "deepity." That is a useful concept!

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