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Sunday, 20 September 2009

Comments

I love the fact that you live in Wisconsin and are shopping for a bike in late September. It shows some faith in the concept that Spring always arrives, sooner or later, and that you'll be there to see it.

Ooohhhh..camera porn...

Just ordered it through the TOP link you provided. Free shipping, such a deal.

Danny Lyon is a name that looms large here at the Art Institute of Chicago. Hugh Edwards, the curator of photography at the AIC during the 1960's, took a real shine to Lyon and helped shine a well-deserved national light on his work. The AIC has a wonderful collection of his work as a result. A good friend and neighbor knew Lyon in the day and also has a nice collection of his prints. (I always eagerly accept his invitations to visit!)

Choose a Trek-made in WI. Mine worked well for BPB.

Mike–I did the same with the Danny Lyon book at my local bookstore the other day. I agree, it's quite good, as is he. I was thrown by the subtitle, too, yet I wonder it's his choice–making a statement about WHAT his work is trying to express, rather than HOW it expresses that.

In case you didn't see it, there was an article in the New York Times a couple of months ago about him and this book. Seems it wasn't his first choice, came about as part of a deal. Good deal for him, to get another book published, and for Phaidon, too, as I'm sure this will sell much better than any individual [photo-]essay.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/26/arts/design/26kenn.html

Thanks for the information I am going to buy one

About a week ago my wife was attempting to educate me about the finer points of perfumes and how to distinguish the good from the...not so good. (Understand, my spouse is frugal to the point of pain, so we're still talking very inexpensive fragrances; but the point remains). Turns out it's quite easy to craft a perfume that carries a head-turning and pleasant "opening" to get your attention. It's much, much harder to create one delivering a complex, lasting fragrance that's still a delight hours later.

The same thing is true with photo books. There are plenty of them out there with an attractive cover and enough initial appeal to tempt one to open the wallet. But the books that have staying power, that I find myself pulling off the shelf and studying time after time...that's a much shorter list. Of course, my list of such books is sure to be different than Mike's, or yours. But a small fraction of the books I encounter in a given year really rise above the mass. Whether it's a genuinely new way of looking at the world, or a consistently excellent body of work, or simply a work of art in book form, they're the ones that make it worth slogging through the disappointments.

Fotorr,

Actually Trek bikes are actually made in Taiwan like almost all other bikes produced in the world. But that's ok, the quality of Taiwanese bikes are far higher than people often think. Indeed, arguably they make almost all of the best bikes in the world, including most of those ridden by world class road, cross country, downhill and BMX riders. But each to their own.

I agree with the comment that "essay" reflects intention as much as method. If you look at the evolution of Lyon's work from Bikeriders through the Texas prisons to the recent "Like a Thief's Dream" his pictures become fewer and fewer. Their place is taken by the subjects' own words and pictures. He talks in "Memories" about passing out photos that he hopes will live on for years into the future, but apparently any photo that has shown such life now carries the meaning he is looking for.

The one outlier is the "Destruction of Lower Manhattan", recently reissued with an afterword that fits into the style and tone of the "Memories" volume. He seems to have been terribly conflicted over that work, and raced away from it to the subjects that were closer to his heart.

scott

Mmmmm, nice looking book. I'm a sucker for collecting old Canon cameras and enjoyed a book on the history of Canon cameras so I think I'll add this book to my Amazon wish list

your affiliate link above to The Last Photographic Heroes goes to a "version" of the book that is not sold direct by Amazon, and that is $5 higher for a new copy than Amazon's price

Mike,

If you think camera review ethics are dodgy, you should see book reviewers. Publishers never want the book back (because books lent to reviewers are like bubble gum and destroyers, they're never in any kind of condition when they're done) and then unscrupulous reviewers will go ahead and sell them to The Strand, which as a shelf full of uncorrected proofs, sometimes untouched.

That said, I suspect photo book publishers would be happy to flood TOP headquarters with uncorrected proofs if you sent them your address.

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