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Thursday, 16 July 2009

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f22 and be there! Pretty sharp recounting by a 96-year-old....

We just closed a show of Julius's work here at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art which consisted of projects here in the state. Several of our curators went out to the Getty and met with him to make the picture selection. They talked about what a great and fascinating man he was. Julius had also been in town about 18 to 24 months earlier and given a talk about his Oklahoma experiences at Untitled Gallery. We were fortunate enough to be able to play a video in the gallery of that talk. We were all saddened, but glad to have been able to do an exhibit of his work.

Sorry to hear that, I'm using a Taschen 2009 agenda full of his images, one per week. Cool modernist architecture very well captured.

There's a fantastic documentary about Mr. Shulman called Visual Acoustics. I was able to see it earlier this year, and it was a great introduction to the man and his work.

http://www.juliusshulmanfilm.com/

 That's a shock, just a week ago I was looking at Visual">http://www.juliusshulmanfilm.com/">Visual Acoustics: The Modernism of Julius Shulman

I really want to see this film if it ever shows anywhere besides LA , Texas , or New Zealand.

There is a neat article about design documentaries Watch Your Back Depp: Design Films Are On a Roll  that mentions it

Visual Acoustics....I knew I recalled that name. Yet another photographer whose work I recognize but name always escapes me.

One of his last commissioned works was of the Annenberg Space for Photography That image is at the bottom of the page.

His work was also part of the inaugural exhibit for the center. Here is a short video that went with the exhibit, along with the other artists featured in that exhibit including Douglas Kirkland and Greg Gorman.

I attended an architectural photography seminar taught by Jules in Iowa City at the State Capitol some years ago. It was a memorable experience that advanced my photography and profession. He really taught us to see from more than just a street curb perspective.

He was born on October 10, 1910, or 10/10/10. How cool is that?

Stumbled across a couple of larger versions of the famous print by Shulman on Shorpy's.
http://www.shorpy.com/node/5073?size=_original

http://www.shorpy.com/node/6514?size=_original

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