« Film vs. 12MP Digital in Large Prints. | Main | Blog Notes »

Monday, 12 January 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00df351e888f8834010536c85f83970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Photo L.A.:

Comments

Thank you for such a good on-the-ground report of Photo LA, John! The art world in general is seeing the same slump that the rest of the economy's sectors are experiencing. Although photography is a poor stepchild of the art world it may be suffering somewhat less acutely due to its "bargain" pricing, although this is also not a good time to speculate. There is no shortage of "good" photography by time-tested names for sale these days. So newcomers will have a harder time to make an impression. (Speaking personally, I'm also not very jazzed by what I see from most "newcomers".)

BTW, the explanation for the profusion of good looking females at big photo shows is very simple; models looking for lenses. I've never been to Photo LA but that tends to be the story. (The explanation for the seedy-looking guys probably has more to do with today's razor-less/un-laundered look.)

26? Why so low? Older men often can have an edge in these things...

Two things.

1. If it hasn't been mentioned one can get a Mitch Dobrowner Folio over at lens work. http://www.lenswork.com/specialeditions/lwfolios.htm FYI.

2. "The Fishmonger’s Daughter" looks remarkably lurid to me. I don't know why. Maybe because I pay women to smack me in the groin with mackerel while wearing a bear costume.

Tom

Re the final observation: The guys, as usual, were at home watching football on the couch. Go figure.

girl? what girls? what about the books? that was the best part! :)

John - thanks for providing an amusing and insightful write up. Living in London, I should note that your observation on the disparity between the young male and female attendees holds true this side of the pond also. Happy hunting.

I got my Still Earth folio (Lenswork)last week. Yeah, Mitch Dobrowner's work is something special.

Thanks for the interesting review of the show.

"A final observation: there was a large collection of really good-looking women, of all ages, at the show. Most of the guys, on the other hand, looked like they’d just fallen off a turnip truck. I don’t know why this should be. Anyway, if I were 26, male, and looking, I’d go to photos shows. I thought you’d like to know that."
Hmmm. My impression has always been sort of the reverse; I mean, photography is astonishingly male-dominated, probably because guys tend to have more of a gadget-fetish than gals, all things being equal. Back when my daughter was whining about not meeting any interesting guys, I repeatedly urged her to hang out at camera stores or a photo club. I mean, think about it: lots of reasonably smart, reasonably employed guys with enough discretionary income to buy photo gear, and enough geek-factor to need help finding female companionship.
Just sayin.
Somehow neither my wife nor my daughter found this amusing or helpful.

"A final observation: there was a large collection of really good-looking women, of all ages, at the show. Most of the guys, on the other hand, looked like they’d just fallen off a turnip truck. I don’t know why this should be. Anyway, if I were 26, male, and looking, I’d go to photos shows. I thought you’d like to know that."

What's interesting about your observation, is that I see the same thing on the East coast. At the workshops, studio parties and exhibits here the women - including those who are togs - look good. The men usually look like they just got back from Afganistan.

Great writeup, best thing I've read all day. :)

Thanks for the review of the show. If I had the $$, I'd pay the 28k for the Kertesz before I'd pay the whatever for the Adams, any day.

About the Garlington photo–I like it, too... the quality is unmistakeable. And though the bear-fish-girl connection works in some way, it just seems sad that a photograph requires that forced, pseudo-surrealist gimmick. It's like your reaction to the Kerstens photos. After I saw the one posted here, I let my imagination fly as to all the different configurations he could have thrown together–a needle and thread, a globe, a piano or lute, and whatsoever other props one finds in your run-of-the-mill Vermeer... Yet to focus solely on the hair, when you have so many other options? I'm sure there was no play with the composition either. So sad to take what could be a really cool idea and make such a one-trick pony out of it.

I felt that the show was dominated by vintage photography, and that a lot of the contemporary work was fairly conservative, maybe chosen to fit in with the vintage prints.

This was an amusing read :)

At every print show I go to I can only ever find "who would put that on their wall??" type images or extremely boring landscapes... I guess it's not limited to my city!

Mike,
The text on this post is a little on the small side. One of the many things I like about your blog is that the text is not (has not been) as tiny as it is on too many sites.

Thanks, I enjoyed reading about images (not equipment), for once. It was certainly a very well-done report, informative and whetting my apetite to hear more.
Bill

It's interesting that the Mapplethorpe silver print jumped out. Mapplethorpe did no printing and had the same full time darkroom tech for the last 10 years of his life.

Mapplethorpe: A Biography by Patricia Morrisroe give a great insight into Mapplethorpe's people skills in his portraits rather than his technical skills with the camera and darkroom.

"Mapplethorpe did no printing and had the same full time darkroom tech for the last 10 years of his life."

John,
Tom Baril, I believe.

Mike J.

"Mapplethorpe did no printing and had the same full time darkroom tech for the last 10 years of his life."

This particular portrait brought Mapplethorpe's whole skill-set together: the lighting was perfect, Rossellini's skin is so fine and delicate that it has to be seen to be believed, and the printing was flawless. Mapplethorpe actually shot a number of portraits with Rossellini, just because of her great skin qualities, I think. She glows in the dark.

Mike should sponsor a "great printers" week on the blog -- I was fascinated to watch James Nachtwey working with his printer in the War Photographer film. It's two artists with one art work, but only the shooter gets the credit (at least with the general public.)

I saw the woman-in-the-camera performance, but to tell the truth, had forgotten about it by the time I went out the door. Yes, I'm a philistine, but, thank god, at least I'm not a philatelist.

Hmm. It's interesting that so many people were interested in the good-looking women observation, and have provided similar testimony from the East Coast and London. It's odd...though, it may be man-fashion, as somebody suggested. Maybe the "back-from-Afghanistan look is in. I've noticed that artists tend to dress the part -- if anybody ever showed up for a college art class in a golf shirt, he'd be laughed out of the place, talent or no talent.

I'm embarrassed not to have reported on the book stalls: there was one with multiple first editions of Robert Frank's "Americans" with the French edition signed. I was interested in the plainness of the covers. Larry Clark was also hot, with several copies of "Tulsa" in evidence and at least one "Teenage Lust," on which I overheard some negotiations. There were several early Cartier-Bressons, also signed, and a near-pristine "Family of Man." Essentially, most of the photo books you ever heard of were there in first editions, but I don't have the first-edition book-collecting bug, so I really didn't pay too much attention to it. I'll do better next time.

JC

In terms of the Hendrik Kerstens images that I saw at Photo LA.

I would comfortably say they are more than influenced by a dutch

photographer Desiree Dolron. Kerstens images pale in comparison.

I saw some of her prints in Amsterdam. outstanding! Link below.

http://www.egodesign.ca/en/article.php?article_id=48

"I would comfortably say they are more than influenced by a dutch photographer Desiree Dolron. Kerstens images pale in comparison."

I followed the link. You're right - they are superior.

Another observation: it's a web only journal. It's interesting how many are ditching an ink on paper edition. The list grows every month.

Nice review. My favorite quote is, "Maybe it’s just me, but I’d have a hard time eating a Subway BMT with extra cheese while staring at the high-res pudenda of a fourteen-year-old."

That says so much to me about the "shock" value of contemporary photography/photographers that just have to be noticed.

In relation to the comments about Dolron, I am fortunate enough to share a dealer with her and have seen her prints in real life. They are beautiful, beautiful images.

And I agree with ben above, give me the Andre Kertesz over the Ansell Adams.

"The Fishmonger’s Daughter"

Very arresting. would love to see a real print.

Mike Garlington has also flickr gallery :
http://www.flickr.com/photos/milkgarlictoast

There is no intention to shock in Sturges's work, which is in fact fairly classical. In contemporary photography, female nudity is only slightly more popular than nature landscapes.

Extremely delightful article. Thanks for the update.

John,

High ISO has nothing to do with it. These are shot on tripods, likely at ISO 100, especially if one is ever concerned with printing.

The comments to this entry are closed.