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Thursday, 19 June 2008

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I just know that my 5D will "still work" should there be a new one on the market! Not a rumour just a fact.

As long as we're talking rumors, the president of Sigma has also gone on record saying there will be a DP2 and DP3. One of these may have a zoom, and the speculation on the other is that it may complement the focal length of the DP1; something like a 40mm f2.0.

If they address the deficiencies of the DP1 and the zoom lens they use is nearly as high-quality as the DP1's, that's a revolution in its own right. Perhaps a smaller market segment (or perhaps not), but revolutionary nonetheless.

Will they really compete with each other? With the investment I have in Canon glass, I wouldn't give the other two a second look.

For how many people would one of these bodies be an entree into the manufacturer's line?

Quoting Ron:
For how many people would one of these bodies be an entree into the manufacturer's line?
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You make a point. However, the number of people that make such bodies their first DSLR purchase might be far greater than common sense would suggest.

One wonders how many photo hobbyists will use these new cameras as an excuse to avoid the tough decisions needed to improve the quality of their photographs using their present equipment by upgrading to the newer better camera which will keep them occupied learning all the new features and spending too much time on internet forums discussing every minutia of the new purchase.
I've been strong willed enough thank goodness to avoid falling for the temptations of Nikon/Canon's last batch of goodies in the DSLR range. I only hope my "higher power" will protect me from the next batch!

Full disclosure: I'm a very happy 5d user for about two years. I think the three need to announce for three different reasons. Nikon users will welcome a backup camera for the D3, and it fills a hole in the Nikon product line, a hole that must be filled as part of their catchup to Canon for the photojournalist and other pro markets. Backup cameras work out much better when they're the same aspect ratio as the primary camera. Canon has sold many 5ds, and it's very long in the tooth. The have to upgrade it to remain credible. The current price of the 5d has shrunk what were once surely great profit margins. And Sony....it's a long term thing. They want to be a fully credible pro choice long term, and since they make sensors, no surprise. They can't get there without FF. With FF and the Minolta lens legacy, they've got a good chance at gradually getting a good part of the high end market. End of rant.

Dear Michael,

Oh, probably about the same percentage who did that every time there was some new film released or wonderful new soup for developing film (which was a couple of times a year).

And why do we care? If that's what people enjoy about the hobby, let them. I think the whole point of photography is to make cool photographs (as obviously you do), but there's a large cadre of hobbyists for whom the point has been the craft and the equipment and the toys. And let's face it, without them supporting the manufacturers, we wouldn't benefit from such rapid improvement of products.

So let them have their fun. It doesn't hurt us and we get fringe benefits.


~ pax \ Ctein
[ please excuse any word salad. MacSpeech in training! ]
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-- Ctein's online Gallery http://ctein.com
-- Digital restorations http://photo-repair.com
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Dear Mike,

An even stronger cautionary tale than the Canon was the Kodak DCS 14n. Short-timers may forget that for a good decade Kodak owned the high-end digital camera business. They set the standards for quality and they made the very best cameras and you paid accordingly (their price point was $15,000 for the top-tier). They had a string of remarkable and groundbreaking successes, both in terms of technology and image quality. In a complex arena where they had made several strategic missteps (Kodak branded magnetic media, Photo CD), they had done this spectacularly well.

The DCS 14n was pushed out the door at least six months (maybe a year) early, to try to steal the thunder from its 11 megapixel competitor. That meant that some serious compromises were made, most especially in the quality of the sensor, which was entirely subpar by the standards that pros reasonably expected from Kodak.

The strategy backfired so badly, from vaporware to producing a post-release upgrade (too expensive, too late) that in my opinion it was a substantial factor, maybe even the major factor, in Kodak ultimately withdrawing from the premium camera market.


~ pax \ Ctein
[ please excuse any word salad. MacSpeech in training! ]
======================================
-- Ctein's online Gallery http://ctein.com
-- Digital restorations http://photo-repair.com
======================================


I may be completely wrong about this, but my feeling is that Nikon is making a marketing mistake, if the specs are true -- the D700 will badly hurt the D3 sales, which, as I understand it, are really going strong. The biggest problem with the D3, for pro or non-pro, is the size of the thing. If the D700 is as robust as the D300, and has the D3 sensor, I can't imagine why anybody would buy the D3. The advantages of it would be only at the margins (battery life, perhaps a more intricate auto-focus), and easily worked around.

As for the D700 working as a backup to the D3, I have a D300 as a backup, and I prefer it that way -- I like the two different sensor sizes, because it gives me that 1.5x factor with 12mp in each FOV. With three f2.8 zooms, I can cover an FOV of 12-300 between the two bodies and three lenses.

JC

I think the point of photography is to be paralyzed by choices so that you never get around to taking pictures but spend all your money trying out different cameras.

Quoting Grega

You make a point. However, the number of people that make such bodies their first DSLR purchase might be far greater than common sense would suggest.


My first dslr was a 5D and I'm still using it. I tried a 'superzoom' P&S for a nearly a year before buying the 5D, and carried on using my AE1 alongside. Since I bought the 5D the Ae1 rarely sees any use, although I did give it some exercise in the last couple of weeks. I also sometimes use a Zorki!

Mike

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